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11-12-2008 CC Rpt A20COUNCIL AGENDA STAFF REPORT et' Meeting Date: November 5. 2008 Public Hearing: El/ Discussion Item: 1 Consent Item: ❑ CITY CLERK USE ONLY 2000110V - i PH 2: 16 TO: HONORABLE MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL MEMBERS FROM: CITY MANAGER SUBJECT: CONSIDERATION AND ACTION REGARDING TRANSMITTAL OF A RESPONSE LETTER TO THE NOTICE OF PREPARATION (NOP) FOR A MEDICAL/MENTAL HEALTH FACILITY IN CHINO Following review and discussion authorize transmittal of a letter in response to the Notice of Preparation (NOP) for a Medical/Mental Health Facility in Chino. BACKGROUND/ANALYSIS: The City is in receipt of a Notice of Preparation (NOP), Exhibit "A" for an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for a Medical/Mental Health Facility in the City of Chino, adjacent to the California Institution for Men (CIM). The California Prison Health Care Receivership Corporation (CPR) has scheduled a public scoping meeting for Thursday, November 20, from 5:00 — 6:30 p.m. at the Chino Community Building located at 5443 B Street in Chino. In that written comments regarding the Notice of Preparation (NOP) are due on Friday, November 21, 2008, a draft comment letter outlining the City's concerns has been prepared (Exhibit "B"). Staff is recommending, following Council review and discussion, that the City Manager be directed to convey this letter containing our comments and concerns to Laura Sainz, CEQA Project Manager for the California Health Care Receivership Corporation. Also attached as Exhibit "C" is a copy of the Community Partners' Plan that was transmitted to the State of California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) on May 10, 2007. The Partnership Plan was developed as a proactive constructive response to the overcrowding problem at CIM as well as statewide. The Plan urged the preparation of a comprehensive Master Plan for the development of a state-of-the-art, new correctional facility on the site of the current California Institute for Men (CIM). The California Institute for Men (CIM) facility is sub -standard in terms of size and the overall condition of the facilities and improvements. The Partnership's objective was to present a comprehensive plan in response to many years of piecemeal efforts to AGENDA DATE: NOVEMBER 12, 2008 PAGE TWO SUBJECT: CONSIDERATION AND ACTION REGARDING TRANSMITTAL OF A RESPONSE LETTER TO THE NOTICE OF PREPARATION (NOP) FOR A MEDICAUMENTAL HEALTH FACILITY IN CHINO address the needs of the inmate population at CIM. Representatives from Chino Hills and Chino have made a number of visits to Sacramento over the past several years, and on numerous occasions received positive feedback from CDCR relative to the Partnership's proposal. The Plan as proposed is a win/win for all of the stakeholders; the Community Partners, the Correctional Officers and the Inmates. A modern state-of- the-art facility would enhance public safety for Chino Hills and Chino, provide a safer work environment for the Correctional Officers, and a facility that would be safer and more conducive to the rehabilitation efforts of the Department of Corrections. In spite of the collective efforts of Chino Hills and Chino, we have been unable to convince the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, as well as the Receiver's Office, that the development of a Master Plan before the addition of a medical/mental health facility is critical. It is the City's position that it is fiscally irresponsible to proceed with the proposed project (siting of the proposed medical/mental health facility) without preparing a Master Plan for the entire facility. The project as proposed will result in the illogical assessment of environmental impacts on a piece meal basis as only the singular impacts of the proposed facility will be assessed rather than a comprehensive plan for CIM. Additionally, as the Receiver is required to address the state-wide issues relating to the Department of Corrections' prison system, singling out only a portion of one facility for environmental review is not in accordance with CEQA regulations. All of the regions of the state should be provided with an overall plan so that each region can assess the impacts of an overall proposed solution to the existing problems that have been indentified by the Court. It is recommended that the attached letter articulating the City's concerns be transmitted to the Receiver's Office as well as other interested parties. REVIEW BY OTHERS: The City Attorney has reviewed this item. FISCAL IMPACT: None as a result of this action. Recommended by, Do-5glag N. La Belle, City Manager AGENDA DATE: NOVEMBER 12, 2008 PAGE THREE SUBJECT: CONSIDERATION AND ACTION REGARDING TRANSMITTAL OF A RESPONSE LETTER TO THE NOTICE OF PREPARATION (NOP) FOR A MEDICAL/MENTAL HEALTH FACILITY IN CHINO Attachments: 1.) Exhibit A — Scoping Meeting Notice and Notice of Preparation for an Environmental Impact Report 2.) Exhibit B — Draft Response Letter to CEQA Project for the California Health Care Receivership Corporation 3.) Exhibit C — May 10, 2007 — Community Partners Plan for CIM 4.) Exhibit D — October 22, 2007 — Joint Chino Hills/Chino Press Release EXHIBIT "A' October 22, 2008 PUBLIC AGENCY SCOPING MEETING NOTICE AND NOTICE OF PREPARATION FOR AN ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT DCN 03628 PROJECT TITLE: California Health Care Facility,' Chino PROJECT LOCATION: California Institute for Man (CIM), 14901 Central Avenue, Chino, CA 91710 PUBLIC AGENCY SCOPING MEETING: On Thursday, November 20, 2008 from 5:00 — 6:30 p.m. the California Prison Health Care Receivership Corporation (CPR) will conduct a public scoping meeting to solicit comments from public agencies and the general public about their concerns and interests to be addressed in the Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for the proposed project. The meeting will be held at the Chino Community Building, located at 5443 B Street, in Chino, California. If you have any questions about this scoping meeting, please contact Laura Sainz, CEQA Project Manager, URS/Bovis Lend Lease Joint Venture at (916) 779-6409. NOTICE OF PREPARATION: As the lead agency, CPR would like to know the views of your agency as to the scope and content of the environmental information which is germane to your agency's statutory responsibilities in connection with the proposed project. The environmental issues to be addressed in the Draft EIR will include, but not necessarily be limited to: Visual Resources Agricultural Resources Air Quality Biological Resources Cultural Resources, . Geology, Soils, Mineral Resources, and Paleontological Resources Hazards and Hazardous Materials Hydrology and Water Quality Land Use and Planning Noise Population and Housing Public Services Recreation Transportation/Traffic Utilities It is anticipated that trustee and responsible agencies will rely on the EIR when considering issuing their applicable permit(s) or other approvals for the proposed project. October 22, 2008 Page 2 COMMENT PERIOD: Comments must be received no later than 30 days after the date of this notice. Thus, comments must be received by November 21, 2008. Please include the name for a contact person in your agency and send your comments to: Laura Sainz CEQA Project Manager for the California Prison Health Care Receivership Corporation URS/Bovis Lend Lease Joint Venture 2400 Del Paso Road, Suite 255 Sacramento, CA 95534 Email: CHCFChinoPublicComments(aa)ursbitiv.Cem Fax: 916-779-6399 PROJECT DESCRIPTION: In accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) (Pub. Resources Code, § 21000 et seq.), the CPR will be preparing an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) to evaluate the environmental effects associated with development of an up to 2,100 bed sub -acute medical care facility located on the grounds of the California Institute for Men at 14901 Central Avenue, Chino in San Bernardino County. In order to fulfill a 2005 mandate from the Federal. Court; CPR has initiated the statewide construction of up to seven new correctional health care facilities, which CPR estimates will provide approximately 10,000 medical and mental health patient beds. The proposed project represents one of the seven facilities to be constructed over the next three years. The facility would consist of housing clusters, diagnostic and treatment centers, an armory, warehouse facilities, a central plant, outdoor recreation fields, a gatehouse, a regional kitchen facility and parking. A lethal electrified fence would surround the secured area, a sally port would be incorporated into the fencing, and a guard tower would be located at the vehicle sally port. The project also includes exterior lighting. Parking would be provided for staff personnel and visitors. On- and off -site infrastructure improvements would also be required. The proposed medical care facility would employ between 3,000-3,600 staff and approximately 100-150 visitors are anticipated per day. In addition to the proposed health care facility, renovations and upgrades to existing CDCR health care facilities at CIM may take place. This component of the proposed project would upgrade administrative and clinical facilities within the existing, prison facilities at 'several locations. These modifications have been determined necessary to improve the qualityanddelivery of medical care at the existing facilities and to recruit highly qualified medical professional,"s to the institutions. If you require additional information related to this, notice, please contact Laura Sainz, CEQA Project Manager at (916) 779-6409. ki PROJECT DESCRIPTION AND LOCATION GENERAL INFORMATION Project Title: California Health Care Facility, Chino Lead Agency: California Prison Health Care Receivership Corporation (CPR) (under the Federal Receivership for the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) medical care system) Laura Sainz CEQA Project Manager for the California Prison Health Care Receivership Corporation URSBovis Lend Lease Joint Venture 2400 Del Paso Road, Suite 255, Sacramento, CA 95834 Project Location: The proposed project site is located at 14901 Central Avenue, on the grounds of the. California Institute for Men (CIAO in Chino, CA. CEQA Requirement: This Notice of Preparation (NOP) is intended to satisfy the requirements of the California Environmental Quality Act, (CEQA), (Public Resources'code, Division 13, Section 21000-21177), and the State CEQA Guidelines (California Code of Regulations, Title 14, Section 15000-15387). Potential Approvals Required: The following agencies may have jurisdiction over elements of the proposed project: . U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service . U.S. Army Corps of Engineers . Federal Aviation Administration . California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation California Department of Transportation i California Department of Toxic Substances Control California Department of Fish and Game California Department of Public Health California State Parks — Office of Historic Preservation • State Water Resources Control Board . Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board South Coast Air Quality Management District Southern California Association of Governments County of San Bernardino Riverside County Airport Land Use Commission City of Chino California Health Care Facility Chino Notice of Preparation California Prison Health Care Receivership 1 October 2008 PROJECT NEED In April 2001, a class action lawsuit, Plata v. Schwarzenegger, was filed by prison inmates' against the State of California contending that the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) was in violation of the Eighth (prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment) and Fourteenth (rightto due process and equal protection) Amendments to the United States Constitution by providing inadequate medical care to prison inmates. In the Plata case, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California found that the current state of California's correctional system does not support a constitutionally adequate level of health care. Similar findings have been issued in several other cases since 2001, including the Coleman case relative to inental health care, the Perez case relative to dental care, and the Armstrong case relative to CDCR's disabled immates. In response to the Plata case, in 2005, the U.S. District Court ordered the establishment of a Receivership to take control of the delivery of medical services to California state prisoners confined by the CDCR. In justifying this decision, U.S. District Court Judge Thelton Henderson pointed, among other things; to the uncontested fact that, on average, one California inmate dies every six to seven days because of constitutional deficiencies in the State prison health care system. The District Court found that removing the CDCR from control'of the medical system and imposing a Receiver to "radically transform" the prison medical system is the "only viable means of saving lives and creating a stable and effective health care delivery system in the CDCR." Once. the prison healthcare system is stabilized and a constitutionally adequate medical system is established, the federal court will remove the Receiver and return control to the State. The California Prison Health Care Receivership Corporation (CPR) is the non-profit organization created to house the activities of the federal Receiver. The CPR 1s charged with creating a system where prison custody and health care staff together can guarantee that initiates° access to health care and services in California prisons meets constitutional standards. The CPR has determined that in order to fulfill the court's mandate; new correctional health care facilities must be constructed statewide. The CPR has identified the need to construct new health care facilities that, in total, will provide approximately 5,000 medical and 5,000 mental health patient beds. Therefore, at this time, the CPR is planning to build up to seven CPR health care facilities. The facilities will be built throughout the state at locations near larger urban areas to help guarantee access to a qualified pool of skilled professionals, such as nurses, doctors, teachers and administrative staff. Therefore, a site adjacent to the existing California Institute for Men (CIM) in Chino has been identified as a potential location for an up to 2,100-bed health care facility. In accordance with CEQA, the CPR will serve as the lead agency and will prepare an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) to evaluate the environmental effects associated with the construction and operation of a new health care facility at the project site. The proposed health care facility will include.building spape foradministrative and clinical functions and housing for the patients. The EIR will identify the significant adveiso ednvironmental impacts of the project and require the adoption of all feasible mitigation rnea'sures or alteinafives`to avoid or substantially reduce the project's significant impacts to the extent feasible. In, accorda%nce with Section 15082 of the CEQA Guidelines, the CPR has prepared this Notice of Preparation to provide responsible(and trustee agencies and other interested parties with information describing the project and the issue' areas that will be evaluated in the EIR. - Notice of Preparation Califomia Health Care Facility Chino October 2008 2 California Prison Health Care Receivership SOURCE. ESM So -e P USA (2006) 9 W Jonas.M &ro .s Regional Location California Health Care Facility Chino California Prison Health Care Receivership Exhibit 4 Notice of Preparation October 2008 PROJECT LOCATION AND SETTING The project site is located within the CIM grounds located at 14901 Central Avenue in Chino, CA. The state . property is bounded by Central Avenue to the west, Euclid Avenue (State Route 83) to the east, Kimball Avenue to the south, and the College Park Specific Plan area to the north. The CIM shares its eastern boundary with the Chino Airport. Regional access to the site is provided by State Route (SR) 71 to the west and SR-60 to the north. Interstate-15 is approximately six miles to the east. Local access to the site is provided by Central Avenue at its _ intersection with Chino Hills Parkway and Manuel Gonzalez Drive. Established in 1941 on a 2,500-acre site, the CIM is the largest minimum security facility in the state and the oldest of its kind. The facility is composed of a Level I holding facility and three reception centers (RC). The Level I security classification is defined by open dormitories without a secure perimeter. The RCs are designed to provide short-term housing to process, classify, and evaluate incoming inmates for their appropriate assignments. The RCs are composed of Reception Center East, Reception Center Central, and Reception Center West. Existing site uses include existing prison operations, associated ancillary uses, non -related prison uses, and agriculture uses. Also on 'site is the Heman G. Stark Youth Correctional Facility (HGSYCF) which houses male wards ages 18 to 25 in living units'composed of individual rooms. Lyle Egan High School at HGSYCF provides instruction in basic skills, remedial courses, GED prep, high school, and college courses. Vocational programs are also offered, and the Free Venture Program provides wards with opportunities to work in a variety of industries. DESCRIPTION OF PROPOSED FACILITIES The CPR proposes to con&6cf a medical care facility on the project site with up to 2,100 beds. The facility would consist of housing clusters, diagnostic and treatment centers, an armory, warehousing and support facilities, a central plant, outdoor.recreation frelds, a gatehouse, a regional production kitchen, staff training facilities, and parking areas. A lethal electrified fence would surround the secured area. A vehicle sally port would be incorporated into the fencing and a guard tower would be located at the vehicle sally port. The project also includes exterior lighting. Parking would be provided for staff and visitors. Improvements to roads and existing utilities (electrical, phone, gas, etc.) and water, wastewater, and drainage infrastructure would be constructed to meet facility demands. An electrical substation may be required on site. The project wiII require the extension of on -and off -site infrastructure to the project site. Between 50 and 75 patients are anticipated to check into and out of the facility each day, although during the start-up period of the facility the number of patients checking in is anticipated to be much higher. The proposed medical care facility would employ between 3,000-3,600 staff working over severaldifferent shifts with - the highest number of staff working between 6 am. and 2 p.m. The facility would operate 24 hours per dayndays per week, and therefore staff would rotate among the various shifts and days of operation. Approximately 100 to'150 visitors are anticipated per day. In addition to the proposed health care facility, renovations and upgrades to existing CDCR health care facilities at CIM may take place. This component of the proposed project would upgrade administrative and clinical facilities within the existing prison facilities at several locations. These modifications have been determined necessary to improve the quality and delivery of medical care at the existing facilities and to recruit highly qualified medical professionals to the institutions. DEMOLITION AND PROJECT CONSTRUCTION The proposed project would be located on a mostly undeveloped yet previously disturbed site. Some structures associated with farming or guard training may need to be demolished. Ground disturbance would result from site grading and installation of on- and off -site infrastructure improvements. Notice of Preparation California Health Care Facility Chino October 2008 4 California Prison Health Care Receivership POTENTIAL ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS The EIR will evaluate the reasonably foreseeable direct, indirect, and cumulative environmental impacts associated with construction and implementation of the California Health Care Facility, Chino project. If, in the course of the analysis, it is determined that significant impacts would result during the proposed project's construction and/or operation, mitigation measures or alternatives will be recommended to reduce significant impacts to less -than -significant levels to the extent feasible. The following issues are proposed for analysis in the EIR: Visual Resources The proposed on -site structures would be from one to three stories; and the project includes a guard tower which could obstruct views of any visual resources if identified in the area. In addition, project site lighting could cause lighting and glare impacts. The EIR will provide an assessment of project impacts on visual resources, as well as lighting and glare impacts. Agriculture Resources The site that will be analyzed in the EIR and the area surrounding it has historically supported and continues to support on -going agricultural operations and activities. On -site agricultural operations have included alfalfa crops and dairy farming. The Farmland Mapping and Monfforiug•Prograrn indicates that portions of the site are designated as Prime Farmland or Farmland of StatewideTinport'ariod- The site, however, is not under a Williamson Act contract. The project's direct and indirect impacts on agricultural resources will be analyzed in the EIR. Air Quality The EIR will describe regional and local air quality in the vicinity of the project site and evaluate impacts to air quality associated with remediation and demolition (if needed), project construction, and project operation. The project's estimated air emissions will be compared to emissions thresholds of the South Coast Air Quality Management District. The EIR will also include a discussion of greenhouse gas emissions and the project's contribution to potential cumulative impacts on global climate. Biological Resources The proposed project involves construction of a proposed heaitl°care, facility on active agricultural land and/or on previously disturbed areas within the existing correctional facility boundaries. Additionally, the proposed project would be surrounded by a lethal electrified fence. Sensitive biological resources can occur in previously disturbed areas and animal mortalities can occur -as a result of the lethal fence.. While it is not anticipated, the proposed project may result in the removal of existing trees. Therefore, the project's potential to affect biological resources will be analyzed in the EIR. Cultural Resources Typically, open flats such as the location of the project site contain few prehistoric resources, usually of a limited extent. Archival research indicates that the project site has a low potential for prehistoric cultural resources on - site. Existing buildings within the 1,800-acre CIM grounds date to the beginning of the prison in 1941. Buildings that are older than 50 years old and have the potential to be adversely affected by the proposed project will be analyzed for historical significance. However, no buildings over 50 years of age are anticipated for removal and/or modification by the proposed project. The EIR will analyze the project's potential to adversely affect cultural resources. Notice of Preparation California Health Care Facility Chino October 2008 6 Califomia Prison Health Care Receivership Geology, Soils, Mineral Resources, and Paleontological Resources Construction of a health care facility on the project site could result in impacts related to geotechnical hazards, including seismicity of the area, potential for liquefaction and subsidence, erodibility of the site's soils, soil stability characteristics, and shrink/swell potential of site soils, as applicable. In addition, it is currently unknown whether potential mineral resources may exist at the project site, and whether development of the proposed project could restrict access to any such resources. Furthermore, it is currently unknown whether the project site soils have the potential to contain paleontological resources. If such resources exist on the site, construction activities associated with remediation, demolition, and grading could result in potentially significant impacts. The EIR will evaluate potential impacts related to geology, soils, mineral resources, and paleontological resources. Hazards and Hazardous Materials Soiree areas of the project site may contain contaminated soils from previous activities including farming. Remediation of affected soils, if present, would be required. Furthermore, operation of the proposed health care facility would involve the handling of hazardous materials and the generation and disposal of medical waste. The EIR will evaluate .the potential for the proposed project to result in impacts related to hazards and hazardous materials. Hydrology and Water Quality The ElR.will describe the project's effect on the hydrology and water quality characteristics of the project, area: including alteration of drainage patterns, erosion, storm water discharges, and flooding. A regional drainage:fioyL bisecis the site and may need to be realigned. Land Use and Planning The EIR will describe the proposed project's potential effects on existing land uses. The CPR is directed to consider relevant federal or state land use policies. However, the CPR is not subject to plans, policies, and regulations adopted by non -state or federal agencies. Nevertheless, the CPR will provide a discussion of relevant local plans and policies because conflicts could potentially result in environmental impacts. Noise The EIR will describe the Project's construction and operational noise levels'and will compare these levels to - applicabie noise thresholds to determine whether the project would resultin a significant noise impact. ThcFJR ,,yill,also consider noise generated by existing surrounding land uses, such as the Chino Airport, and will evalpgte; 'tlie:potential effects on the proposed health care facility. Population and Housing The EIR will evaluate the project's effect on population and housing in the local area based on projections of project employment and distribution of the employees by place of residence. Public Services The EIR will evaluate the project's effect on local police and fire services, as well as schools. Recreation The proposed project could potentially contribute to regional population growth due to the jobs created by the proposed health care facility, which could indirectly result in the increase in use of parks and other recreational facilities. This issue will be analyzed in the EIR. California Health Care Facility Chino Notice of Preparation California Prison Health Care Receivership 7 October 2008 Transportation/Traffic The EIR will evaluate the project's impact on regional and local transportation facilities based on a transportation analysis that will assess both construction -related impacts (heavy truck trips and construction worker trips), as well as operational impacts (employee trips, patient transport, access, and parking). A traffic study will be prepared for the project in consultation with the City of Chino, San Bernardino County, and Caltrans. Utilities The EIR will analyze the current capacity of the storm water drainage, water, wastewater, natural gas, and electrical systems and the project's impact on these systems. An analysis of local water supply conditions will be provided. The EIR will describe the existing dry utilities (gas, electric, phone, etc.) and water, including local water supply conditions, wastewater, and drainage facilities within the project vicinity, and provide an impact analysis of on -site and off-s ite utility line construction. The EIR will also describe the existing solid waste facilities that serve the site. Growth Inducement The EIR will evaluate the project's potential for growth inducement resulting from expansion or extension of infrastructure improvements, as well as new demand for housing, and goods and services. The effect of primary.,and secondary increases in employment and economic activity will be discussed. `Giiiiiulative Impacts The EIR will discuss the incremental contribution of the project to cumulative effects of other past, current, and reasonably foreseeable future development in the vicinity. ALTERNATIVES EVALUATED IN THE EIR In accordance with the CEQA Guidelines Section 15126.6, the EIR will describe a reasonable range of alternatives to the proposed project that are capable of meeting most of the project's objectives, but would avoid or substantially lessen any of the significant effects of the project. The EIR will also identify any alternatives that were considered but rejected by the lead agency as infeasible and briefly explain the reasons why. The EIR will also provide an analysis of the No Project Alternative. .•., ;OPPORTUNITY FOR PUBLIC COMMENT Interested individuals, groups, and agencies may provide the CPR with written comments on topics to be ",Wddiessed in the EIR for the project. Because of time limits mandated by state law, comments should be provided ho'later than 5 p.m. on November 21, 2008. A public scoping meeting will be held on Thursday, Novem'6er ' 20"', from 5-6:30 p.m. at the Chino Community Building located at 5443 B Street in Chino, CA to solicit'" comments from public agencies and the public about their concerns and interests to be addressed in the, EIR. Agencies that will need to use the EIR when considering permits or other approvals for the proposed project should provide the CPR with the name of a staff contact person. Please send all comments to: Laura Sainz CEQA Project Manager for the California Pris on Health Care Receivership Corporation URSBovis Lend Lease Joint Venture 2400 Del Paso Road, Suite 255, Sacramento, CA 95834 Email: CHCFChinoPublicComments@ursblljv.com Fax: 916-779-6399 Notice of Preparation California Health Care Facility Chino October 2008 8 California Prison Health Care Receivership November 12, Laura Sainz CEQA Project Manager for the California Prison Health Care Receivership Corporation URS/Bovis Lend Lease Joint Venture 2400 Del Paso Road, Suite 255 Sacramento, CA 95834 Re: Notice of Preparation — California Health Care Facility, Chino (DCN 03628) The City of Chino Hills is writing to express its disappointment with and opposition to the project outlined in the Notice of Preparation (dated October 22, 2008 — "NOP") for the California Health Care Facility proposed to be located in the City of Chino and outside the eastern boundary of the City of Chino Hills. This letter is meant to serve as a preliminary response to the NOP. The City of Chino Hills will be providing a more detailed response before November 21, 2008. Please be advised that the project proposed in the NOP is unacceptable given that such includes mental health beds and fails to provide sufficient information to determine whether it includes a comprehensive plan for the rehabilitation of the existing facilities. The region continues to be burdened by more than its fare share of the region's correctional facilities. The project would serve to increase this burden by placing mental health beds at the existing facility and apparently not address the failing and unsafe condition of the existing facilities. This is disheartening given the Receiver's failure to meet and engage in good faith discussions with Chino and Chino Hills to discuss viable alternatives to the proposed project that would address these issues. This failure evidences a lack of respect for the Cities' interests. With this said, the City of Chino Hills remains willing to engage in further discussions to attempt to resolve the City's concerns so long as the meetings are conducted in good faith. The NOP is vague with respect to the location of the proposed project. The "Project Location" is identified as "California Institute for Men (CIM) 14901 Central Avenue, Chino, CA 91710." The NOP restates this location in several places. However, there is a reference to 2500 acres in the NOP and Exhibit 2 references 3 areas (State Property Boundary, Proposed Project Area, Chino Airport). Exhibit 2 also references a location marked by a boxed caption that reads "CIM." Based upon this information, it appears that the only area that is being considered for the project is the "CIM" area depicted by City Council: Ed M. Graham Curt Hagman W.C. "Bill" Kruger Gwenn E. Norton -Perry Peter J. Rogers 14000 City Center Drive, Chino Hills, CA 91709 ® (909) 364-2600 • FAX (909) 364.2695 9 www.chinohills.org Laura Sainz November 12, 2008 Page Two the boxed caption. If this incorrect then the NOP needs to be amended and re- circulated so that interested parties have adequate notice of the project description and location. Finally, the City wants to make clear that we will not accept any facilities being located within 4500 feet of any existing residential developments. Given the vast amount of undeveloped property in the Southern California region, it would be irresponsible to subject existing residential properties to the secondary effects of correctional facilities being located so close to their homes. While Chino Hills is deeply disappointed by the project described in the NOP and is committed to opposing the project as currently proposed, again, we remain open to engaging in a constructive dialogue to resolve this impasse. Sincerely, Douglas N. La Belle City Manager DLB:ssr cc: Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger State Senator -Elect Bob Huff Assemblyman -Elect Curt Hagman Mayor and City Council EXHIBIT "C" ENNIS R. YATES Mayor EUNICE M. ULLOA Mayor Pro Tem GLENN DUNCAN EARL C. ELROD TOM HAUGHEY C.GG61 Members GLEN ROJAS Manager CITY of CHINO City May 10, 2007 Secretary Jim Tilton Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation 1515 S. Street, Suite 502 South Sacramento, CA 95814 Dear Secretary Tilton: First of all, let me thank you again on behalf of the communities of Chino and Chino Hills and our Community Partners for your recent visit and interest in improving the California Institution for Men (CIM) in Chino. We all realize you have a monumental job ahead of you in addressing the overcrowding problem Statewide. As two communities and our Community Partners, we stand ready to assist you with the institutions here in Chino. Attached you will find a proposal that we believe provides a great opportunity to address the overcrowding situation at CIM. We believe that the value of land in Chino continues to escalate, which only enhances the opportunity for the State to generate substantial amounts of new revenue that can be combined with Prison Bond funding that has recently been approved. We also realize that the Governor has established priorities directed at assisting inmates in transitioning to society once they serve their time. We believe this area can be addressed through our local Community College, Chaffey College (Community Partner) by implementing valuable vocational education opportunities. The Mayors of Chino and Chino Hills along with the City Managers of these communities look forward to meeting with you in Sacramento on May 23, 2007. We hope to talk in more detail about our proposed plan that we believe addresses many of the State's priorities as they relate to prison overcrowding and transitioning inmates back to society. Please do not hesitate to contact my office if you have any questions or require any clarification of the plan. cerely, le City Manager City of Chino CC: Community Partners 13220 Central Avenue. Chino. California 91710 Mailing Address: P.O. Sox 667. Chino, California 91705-0667 r- (909) 627-7577 • (909) 591-6529 Fax Web Site: www.chyofehino.org California Institution for Men Renovation/New Construction Proposal Submitted by: Community Partners of the Chino Valley The Cities of Chino and Chino Hills along with the Chino Valley Unified School District, inland Empire Utilities Agency, 4`h District County Supervisor, Chamber of Commerce and the Chino Valley Independent Fire District (Community Partners) want to partner with the State in addressing the prison overcrowding problem that currently exists. The Community Partners want to be a positive influence on the outcome of this very difficult situation with the focus of our participation on the safety of the community, public safety officers (including Correctional Officers) and inmates that live in the prison system. At the request of the Mayors of Chino and Chino Hills, California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation Secretary Tilton met with the Community Partners in the City of Chino. During the meeting, the Community Partners proposed a unique plan that could assist the State in generating substantial revenues that could be applied to the renovation of existing and/or construction of new facilities at the California Institution for Men in Chino. The proposal includes the concept of surplusing large amounts of State owned land that surrounds the prison to private development interests at market real estate rates. The proceeds could then offset the cost to renovate/construct the CIM facilities providing a safer institution. The State would match these funds with prison bond monies, which would enhance the amount of reconstruction that could be implemented. Secretary Tilton expressed interest in this concept and asked that a proposal be drawn up and submitted for fw-ther review. The following plan that could generate revenues for the State is provided for review and action: Overview CIM currently encompasses approximately 1,500 acres of land with a majority of that land sitting vacant. It is estimated that approximately 600 acres -- 800 acres if California Youth Authority (CYA) is moved -- could be considered surplus and sold to private interests generating approximately $360 million. The State could use these funds to offset costs to reconstruct facilities at CIM, which would greatly improve the safety of converted offices and the living conditions of the prison inmates. This land is adjacent to the 100 acre Chaffey College campus that is currently under construction, which could provide a valuable training resource for Correctional Officers and staff as well as vocational training for inmates being released to society. Specifics • The 600 +/- acres it question are located on the east and south boundaries of CIM (Euclid and Kimball Avenues). See attached maps. • The current zoning for this land is open space/institutional. The land would need to be rezoned by the City of Chino City Council to maximize the value of the surplus land. • The current California Youth Authority located on Euclid Ave. could be moved interior to the CTM grounds and relocated in new and improved buildings using funds generated by the sale of surplus land. Relocating CYA to the interior frees approximately 200 acres along a major highway where the value of land is escalating at a rapid rate. If CYA were to be moved, there would be a surplus of 800 acres. • The existing shooting range would also need to be moved to a safer location creating additional surplus land that is located at a major prime intersection of the City of Chino and Chino Hills. • The vacant land buffer would still exist, but would be substantially reduced. A different kind of buffer zone would then exist with commercial, industrial and office complexes. • The $360 million (conservative estimate) generated from the sale of land would reduce the amount that • the State would have to bond for to make the same improvements. • The State would match this revenue with prison bond funds. Benefits • State realizes approximately $360 million in new revenue (600 acres). • If CYA is moved interior, the acreage increases to 800, which generates approximately $480 million. • The State could add this amount to a bond issue or reduce the amount needed by a bond. • Potential rezoning of land will create new opportunities for jobs and commerce. The proposed rezoning could be as follows (see attached map): o Option 1— 600 acres Commercial/office: 155 acres yielding 4,000 jobs Manufacturing: 148 acres yielding 3,400 jobs Warehouse: 397 acres yielding 1,600 jobs Total Jobs: 9,000 o Option 2 — 800 acres Commercial/office: 355 acres yielding 9,200 jobs Manufacturing: 148 acres yielding 3,400 jobs Warehouse: 3987 acres yielding 1,600 jobs Total Jobs: 14,200 • Valuable training opportunities could be provided by Chaffey College to Correctional Officers, staff and vocational training for imnates being prepared for release to society (see attached letter). This is a major focus of the State and this proposal provides excellent opportunities to meet that need in a safer and improved facility. The Community Partnership has Identified Issues to be addressed with this plan • The State should address the sewage problem that exists on site at CIM. Inland Empire Utilities Agency (IEUA), a Community Partner, provides sewage and reclaimed water service to the region. IEUA is located directly across the southern border of CM, which provides an excellent opportunity for CIM to connect to the regional sewage system. IBUA has determined that adequate capacity is available to connect CJM (see attached letter). The State could contribute to local conservation by partnering with IEUA with their efforts to clean storm water runoff through natural means. A conservation system is being built directly across the southern border of CIM. The State could address the water issues that exist on the CIM property. The City of Chino and IEUA would be willing to lend their expertise to assist the State in addressing this very important issue. Mental Health FacWty Community partners would be willing to keep discussions open on thus issue, but continues to oppose the facility based on the limited information available at this time. Summary Community Partners stands ready to work with the Governor and the State Departments that would be impacted by this proposal. A great opportunity exists to utilize the resources that exist around the CIM property to substantially resolve a major overcrowding problem that has created major safety issues. The partnership stands ready to work with the Department of Corrections to achieve the goals and objective of the Public Safety and Offender Rehabilitation Services Act of 2007 (AB900). Legislation is needed to allow for the revenue from surplus land to be used at C1M for reconstruction. Community Partners recognize the broad goals of the prison and we stand ready and willing to partner with the State and begin the planning process as well as the Iegislative steps needed to make this proposal work. Submitted by Community Partners For information, please contact: Glen Rojas Doug LaBelle City Manager City Manager City of Chino City of Chino Hills 13220 Central Ave. 2001 Grand Ave. Chino, CA 91710 Chino Hills, CA 91709 909/591-9806 909/364-2610 909/591-6829 909/364-2695 Chaffey College May 7, 2007 Glen Rojas City Manager City of Chino 13220 Central Avenue Chino, CA 91710 Dear Mr. Rojas, In response to the proposal that is being developed by the Cities of Chino, Chino Hills and other parties to address overcrowding at the California Institution of Men (CIM) and other key issues related to prison reform; I would share some potential contributions fi-om Chaffey Community College. As a partner in the community, Chaffey College has entered into a program with the California Institution of Women in Chino to provide courses to inmates; courses that lead to the earning of an Associates Degree. The courses are offered to selected inmates who are approaching parole from the institution and who have demonstrated the desire to benefit this opportunity. It is the college's belief that as the women inmates are released to society, they will do so with a college degree leading to a heightened sense of self- esteem and self-confidence. The expected outcome is a positive impact on the recidivism rate of these imnates. As the plamring continues toward the renovation within the CIM, Chaffey College can look to the possibility of offering academic coursework and/or vocational training to irnnates in addition to training opportunities for Correctional Officers assigned to the institution. College staff would look- forward to actively joining individuals from Chino, Chino Hills and other interested partners in the future to advance the discussions and the planning for these expanded educational opportunities. If there is anything further that you feel Chaffey College can do to support the City's efforts toward the proposed improvements at CIM, please do not hesitate to contact me. I and others at the college look forward to working with you in this important and valuable work, Sinccr�, Robert id. Bell, Ed.D. Vice President/Chief Adnninisn-a.tive Officer 5885 Haven Avenue, Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91737-3002 ' 909/987-17:57 Far.: 909/941-2783 �Fy i t � g¢ " UTILITIES ,'-`,GBJC :. 'oun.crpa' Water Orsmc: May 7, 2007 Secretary James E. Tilton Secretary of Corrections and Rehabilitation Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation 1515 "S" Street Sacramento, CA 95814 Dear Secretary Tilton: 6075 Kimball Avenue . Chino, CA 91710 P.O. Box 9020 . Chino Hills, CA 91709 TEL (909) 993-i600 . FAX (909) 993-1983 www.ieua.org The Inland Empire Utilities Agency (IEUA), a municipal water district formed in 1950, provides wastewater and sewer services to the City of Chino (and the cities of Ontario, Fontana, Chino Hills, Rancho Cucamonga, Montclair and Upland). During the past five years, the Agency has met with representatives of CIM and the Department of Corrections (and other State officials) to indicate that IEUA is willing to provide wastewater treatment and recycled water supplies to CIM. IEUA supports the development of a plan for the potential urban development at CIM. We look forward to wrorldng with you and the Cities of Chino and Chino Hills on the preparation of the plan. Sincerely, INLAND EMPIRE UTILITIES AGENCY Richard W. Atwater Chief Executive Officer General Manager C.C. Glen Rojas, City of Chino Doug La Belle. City of Chino Hills ift, -F-Ale Years o; Exce Cleo--- in V;iater Resour--es & Cltaljty lllaneoer`rrei-,i _ -... -..S-r - - _ tiv' "oE• -_- _ -- e'rY C=z :i'n Richgrc YJ. fy;vrae' P.esrde!, trr, �i2si^en: Sec"etsry7rzacurer Darr.;ors Directo• Chrei E3eCUilve. office, General;✓,anaaer EXHIBIT "D" Date: October 22, 2008 Contact: Michelle Van Der Linden (909) 591-9803 Denise Cattern (909) 364-2615 Federal Receiver Moving Forward with Plans for CIM Site Today the City of Chino was advised of the Federal Receiver's plans to move forward with the environmental review process, the first step that could ultimately lead to the placement of a medical/mental health facility on the California Institution for Men (CIM) property. The news was a crushing disappointment to elected officials in the cities of Chino and Chino Hills and their community partners who have been fighting the placement of this type of facility in Chino for years. This is another example of how broken this system really is," said Chino Mayor Dennis Yates. "We provided a global solution to the state's complex prison issue that would have worked very well here in Chino and it took the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) nearly fourteen months to even respond. When they finally did, the CDCR did not ask questions or discuss the proposal with us at all; we were simply told that our proposal was not a viable solution based on research they had conducted. After reviewing their research, we had numerous questions about their findings and conclusions and requested the opportunity to respond," said Mayor Yates. "We then met with the CDCR in late August and we were led to believe that our proposal was being reconsidered. During that meeting, CDCR Secretary Matthew Cate indicated that he and his staff would do some research and get back to us in a couple of weeks on two key legal questions he had; we are still awaiting his response. We then found out on October 3 through several CDCR consultants, that the CDCR had commissioned a study regarding the placement of additional correctional facilities on CIM property, but that the CDCR is not looking at replacing the deteriorating CIM facility, which was the primary purpose of our proposal," said Mayor Yates. "It is very frustrating that after all of our efforts the state can't work with the Chino Valley to find a compromise solution that works for all affected parties," said Chino Hills Mayor Curt Hagman. Over seventeen months ago in a collaborative effort, the City of Chino and Chino Hills along with various community partners submitted a comprehensive plan to the CDCR, proposing the sale of excess state owned land in Chino, which would create the economic engine that would help fund the ,.onstruction of a new state-of-the-art prison facility. This new facility would replace the aging, deteriorated and overcrowded prison that stands on the site today, providing a safer environment for the prisoners, correctional officers and the community. "The CDCR's inability to respond or move forward with our plan in a timely manner has forced the Federal Receiver to move forward without the benefit of a master plan for the CIM site," said Mayor Yates. "This is a huge disappointment to all of us in Chino, Chino Hills and to our dedicated community partners who undertook the state's complex problem and proposed a global solution." The FederafReceiver's office plans to hold a public scoping meeting on Thursday, Noverhber 20- from 5:00 - 6:30 pin at the Chino Community Building which is located at 5443 "B" Street. Anyone with questions or concerns regarding this project is encouraged to attend this meeting. CITY OF CHINO HILLS INTEROFFICE MEMORANDUM DATE: November 5, 2008 TO: MAYOR HAGMAN MAYOR PRO TEM ROGERS COUNCIL MEMBER GRAHAM COUNCIL MEMBER KRUGER COUNCIL MEMBER NORTON-PERRY n FROM: MARY M. MCDUFFEE, CITY CLERK SUBJECT: WEST VALLEY MOSQUITO AND VECTOR CONTROL DISTRICT APPOINTMENT mot The term of Tim Foster, the City's appointee to the West Valley Mosquito and Vector Control District Board of Trustees, will expire on January 5, 2009. Mr. Foster has been the City's appointee to the Board since shortly after incorporation. Health and Safety Code Section 2024 (a) provides that the term of office for a member of the Board of Trustees shall be for a term of two or four years, at the discretion of the appointing authority. Terms of office commence at noon on the first Monday in January. cc: City Manager Douglas N. La Belle Assistant City Manager Kathy Gotch 2l