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Environmental Science Associates (formerly PCR Services) A2015-129 A2CITY OF CHINO HILLS AMENDMENT NO. 2 TO AGREEMENT NO. A2015-129 BETWEEN THE CITY OF CHINO HILLS AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATES (FORMERLY PCR SERVICES CORPORATION) THIS AMENDMENT NO. 2 to Agreement No. A2015-129, dated May 12, 2015 is entered into in the State of California by and between the City of Chino Hills, a California general law municipal corporation, hereinafter called "City", and Environmental Science Associates (formerly PCR Services Corporation) hereinafter called "Consultant". Amend Agreement A2015-129 as follows: 1. Change Company name to Environmental Science Associates 2. Replace the notice address in Section 23 with the following: Environmental Science Associates 2121 Alton Parkway, Suite 100 Irvine, CA 92606 Attn: David Crook, Project Manager 3. Extend contract term to June 30, 2018 4. Replace the existing Exhibits A and B with the attached Exhibits A and B 5. Increase the Agreement not -to -exceed amount by $33,800 as follows: Original Agreement: $ 403,720 Amendment No. 1 $ 14,780 Amendment No. 2 33,800 Total Revised Contract Amount (ANNUAL not -to -exceed): $ 452,300 All other provisions of the agreement remain in effect. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the City Council of the City of Chino Hills has caused this Amendment No.2 to Agreement No. A2015-129 to be subscribed by its duly authorized officers, on its behalf, on July 11, 2017 and the said party of the second part has signed this Agreement. CITY OF CHINO !-TILLS uez Mayor ATTEST: Cheryl Balz City Clerk APPROa/,ED AS TO FORM: Mark D. `Hensley City Attorney ENVIR MENTAL SCIENCE ASS CIATES (Signature) J Ziff Director (Title) (Signature) (Title) EXHIBIT A HIDDEN OAKS RANCH COUNTRY CLUB DEVELOPMENT PROJECT EIR SCOPE OF WORK In accordance with CEQA requirements and the City of Chino Hills' Environmental Study Guidelines, PCR will complete the environmental review process for the project through preparation of an EIR with the City of Chino Hills as the Lead Agency. The table below lists the requisite tasks as outlined by the City's RFP. Following the table is a description of each of these separate tasks. Task Task Description 1 Project Kick -Off 2 Review and Prepare Technical Reports 3 Prepare Initial Study and Notice of Preparation 4 Prepare Screencheck, Administrative EIR 5 Prepare Draft EIR 6 Prepare Final EIR 7 Prepare Project Record 8 Management, Meetings/Teleconferences & Hearings 9 (Optional) Tree Inventory & Report (PCR & Mike HuJD 10 (Optional) Visual Simulations (KTU+A) 11 Additional Effort due to Project Changes (Amendment No. 2) Task 1: Project Kick -Off As part of this task, PCR and our subconsultant team will attend a project kick-off meeting with City staff and the applicant team in order to gather information, materials, and reports regarding the project, discuss specific technical issues and approach for the EIR process, and establish communication protocols. Following the kick-off meeting, PCR will prepare an Information Needs Memorandum that identifies the specific information necessary to complete various analyses in the EIR, which is assumed to be provided by the City or project applicant, as appropriate. Task 2: Review and Prepare Technical Reports As noted above, PCR or its subconsultant team will prepare various project -specific technical reports, or perform peer reviews of applicant -provided technical reports, in support of the Draft EIR. This scope of work assumes that peer reviews of the applicant -provided technical reports by the PCR team will result in the need for only minor changes or modifications, and will be adequate for purposes of CEQA to support the respective analyses in the EIR. Should it be determined that these reports require more involved revisions or additional analysis, efforts to render the analyses adequate would be considered out of scope and could affect the project schedule. The specific tasks to be performed as part of these technical reports and peer reviews are discussed in detail below. Air Quality Study PCR has extensive experience preparing air quality assessments throughout Southern California. PCR has developed a refined approach to performing air quality analyses pursuant to the standards and guidelines set forth by the California Air Resources Board (CARB) and the South Coast Air Quality Management District Page 1 of 24 (SCAQMD). With respect to air quality, PCR will describe the existing environmental setting and discuss pertinent air quality statutes and regulations at the local, regional, state and federal level. PCR will define the thresholds of significance based on guidelines from the SCAQMD. PCR will quantify daily maximum construction and operational emissions using SCAQMD's recommended California Emissions Estimator Model (CaIEEMod). Construction emissions will be based on the expected construction schedule, equipment mix, earthmoving operations, and number of construction worker and delivery trips. As the project will require large amounts of grading (-2 million cubic yards), additional analysis will be performed to account for fugitive dust generated from these activities. Operational emissions will be based on build out of the project and estimated vehicle trips. In accordance with SCAQMD guidelines, PCR will assess localized impacts to nearby sensitive receptors from construction and operation using the SCAQMD Final Localized Significance Threshold Methodology (LST). The use of LST screening tables is allowed for projects less than five acres in size. As the project is greater than five acres, PCR is proposing to perform dispersion modeling, using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and SCAQMD-approved AERMOD dispersion model. The localized analysis will focus on off- site sensitive receptors including residential uses located to the north, east and west of the site for both long- term (24-hour) and short-term exposures (1- and 8 -hour exposures). The maximum impact for each phase will take into account localized construction emissions and distance to the closest on-site and off-site receptors. Construction and operational emissions analysis will be performed for one project scenario. The localized analysis will also be performed programmatically allowing for flexibility in future project clearance. Operation of the project is not expected to generate substantial amount of emissions from on-site area and stationary sources. Therefore, operational LST impacts will be assessed based on the screening tables provided in the LST Methodology. PCR will prepare qualitative discussion of the potential for the project to cause or contribute to the formation of CO hotspots as a result of project -generated trips on local roadways. PCR assumes that a traffic report containing intersection volumes and level of service (LOS) will be provided for key intersections impacted by the project. The potential for toxic air contaminants (TAC) and odor impacts will be assessed based on land use compatibility recommendations from CARB and the SCAQMD. The project is not expected to contain sources of TACs such as diesel generators or heavy duty truck activity. Therefore, PCR will perform a qualitative analysis of TACs emissions from project operations. If it is determined that a detailed health risk assessment (HRA) is required, it may be performed under separate scope and budget. A recent CEQA court decision (Sierra Club v. County of Fresno) requires more detailed analysis of health impacts resulting from project emissions. As a result, PCR will prepare a qualitative assessment of health impacts due to project emissions. If PCR discovers that a refined analysis (commonly referred to as a Health Impact Assessment) is needed, this work can be performed under a separate scope and fee, to be negotiated later. PCR will assess consistency of the project with the most recent SCAQMD Air Quality Management Plan (AQMP) and assess cumulative impacts by identifying new related projects within the project vicinity and address the CEQA consideration that the project may have impacts that, although not individually significant, could be cumulatively considerable. If potentially significant impacts are identified for construction or operations, PCR will develop mitigation measures where feasible to address and reduce the significant air quality impacts. Mitigation measures will be based on measures recommended by the City and the SCAQMD, as well as other appropriate measures. PCR will prepare one draft version of the Air Quality Technical Report, and one final version in response to a consolidated set of review comments from the City or other interested parties or agencies. This scope assumes that details regarding construction schedule and operation of the proposed project are provided by Page 2 of 24 the City. If these data are not known, PCR can assist in developing this information, for a scope and fee to be negotiated later. Biological Resources Assessment Update PCR conducted surveys for the 537 -acre Hidden Oaks Ranch Country Club project (previously referred to as the Chino Hills Country Club project) in 2010 and 2012, and prepared a Biological Resources Assessment (BRA) report dated October 2012 (herein referred to as the 2012 BRA). PCR is currently assisting the City of Chino Hills with identifying and avoiding sensitive biological resources during geotechnical investigations on the project site. This scope of work would provide an update to previous work conducted by PCR, as follows: ■ Database search for sensitive plant and animal species, including species of special concern, and threatened and endangered species ■ General biological survey, habitat evaluations, and vegetation mapping including sensitive natural communities (e.g., coast live oak woodland, walnut woodland, riparian habitats, and coastal sage scrub) ■ Habitat assessment for least Bell's vireo (Vireo bellii pusillus), and southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) and updated memo ■ Focused surveys for coastal California gnatcatcher (Polioptila californica californica) and survey report ■ Focused surveys for sensitive plants ■ Focused burrow survey for burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia) ■ Update to the BRA No substantial changes to the jurisdictional drainages previously identified on the site are expected to have occurred since the last update in 2012. As such, an additional update to the jurisdictional investigation is not considered warranted and is not included in this scope of work. This scope also includes optional tasks that were identified as applicable for the project site following previous work in 2012, but were not conducted at that time. These include: ■ Focused owl survey for burrowing owl and report; and ■ Tree inventory and report. Details of these tasks are provided below. Conduct Database Search and Update Sensitive Species Tables Databases of sensitive biological resources are continually being updated. As such, PCR will conduct a database search to determine if any new sensitive species and habitats have been documented in the region that would need to be analyzed under CEQA. These databases include the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Listed Species Occurrences Data Base, the California Natural Diversity Data Base (CNDDB), and the California Native Plant Society (CNPS) inventory. The results of the database search will be used to complete the General Biological Survey, Habitat Evaluations, and Vegetation Mapping below and to update the sensitive plant and wildlife species tables that will be incorporated into the updated BRA (see discussion below). Conduct Update to General Biological Survey, Habitat Evaluations, and Vegetation Mapping Using the results of the updated database search (see discussion above) and the 2012 BRA, PCR biologists will perform a general biological survey and habitat assessment of the project site to verify the biological Page 3 of 24 resources previously identified on-site are consistent with current conditions. This would include sensitive plant communities and/or the presence of habitats that could support sensitive, endangered, or threatened plant and wildlife species. All species observed will be included in the Floral and Faunal Compendium of the technical updated BRA. If any changes in vegetation communities and/or their boundaries are observed, an updated vegetation map will be prepared in the field with the use of a current aerial photograph and topographic map to determine the presence and extent of each plant community on-site. At the conclusion of the field mapping, the plant communities will be digitized using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology and the extent of each plant community will be calculated for use in the updated BRA. This task does not include focused surveys for sensitive plant and wildlife species, or a tree inventory. Habitat assessments and/or species surveys are outlined in additional tasks below, and in Optional Tasks A and B. Conduct Updated Habitat Assessment for Least Bell's Vireo and Southwestern Willow Flycatcher and Prepare Memo A habitat assessment will be conducted for least Bell's vireo and southwestern willow flycatcher to confirm the project site still lacks the appropriate riparian habitat to support these species, as determined in 2012. An updated memo will be prepared documenting the results of the habitat assessment. The budget for this task does not include focused surveys for least Bell's vireo or southwestern willow flycatcher. If suitable habitat for these species has established since the 2012 assessment, focused surveys will be required and are subject to a separate scope of work. Conduct Focused Surveys for Coastal California Gnatcatcher and Prepare Report Focused surveys for coastal California gnatcatcher were conducted by PCR in 2012. These surveys need to be updated since the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) typically only consider them valid for one to two years maximum. As such, PCR will perform approved USFWS protocol surveys for the federally threatened coastal California gnatcatcher in 2015. In accordance with USFWS presence/absence survey guidelines; a maximum of six (6) surveys, each at least one week apart, are recommended during the breeding season (March 15 to June 30). The surveys will be conducted within all potentially suitable habitat between 6:00 a.m. and 12:00 p.m. As a requirement of the permit to survey for the coastal California gnatcatcher, permitted individuals will notify the USFWS at least 15 working days prior to the anticipated start date of survey work. As required under USFWS (survey) permit conditions, report of findings will be submitted to the USFWS within 45 days of completion of protocol surveys. The letter report will include the project site location plotted on USGS 7.5 -minute topographic map; plant community map, qualitative description of the project site's habitat, and description of plant composition on and adjacent to the project site surveyed; survey methodology including list of all biologists, number of acres of habitat surveyed, and the number and dates of surveys; characterization of land uses surrounding the project site; mapping of precise locations where any coastal California gnatcatcher are detected; a full account of numbers and behavior of any coastal California gnatcatcher detected; and completed field forms showing the locations of coastal California gnatcatcher, if observed, which will be utilized by the CNDDB. Conduct Focused Surveys for Sensitive Plants Focused surveys for sensitive plant species were conducted by PCR in 2010 and 2012. These surveys need to be updated since USFWS and California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) typically only consider them valid for one to two years maximum. As such, PCR will conduct focused sensitive plant species surveys within suitable habitat to confirm the presence/absence of previously identified sensitive plant species and to determine any new sightings within the project site. Emphasis will be placed on those species surveyed Page 4 of 24 for in 2010 and 2012, as well as any additional species with potential to occur on-site based on the updated database search proposed above. Surveys will be conducted in 2015 pursuant to published USFWS and CDFW guidelines. Based on known blooming periods, it is recommended that a total of two sensitive plant surveys be conducted in order to ensure that each species blooming period falls within at least one of the surveys. One survey will be conducted in May and one in August within all suitable habitat on-site to encompass the flowering periods of all potentially present sensitive plants. Due to the size of the site each survey will require three days to complete. The location of any observed sensitive species will be recorded and mapped on an aerial photograph of the project site. The findings of the survey will be incorporated into the updated BRA. Update Existing Biological Resources Assessment A CEQA-level technical Biological Resources Assessment (BRA) was prepared by PCR in 2012, which documents the study findings from 2010 and 2012. The 2012 technical BRA was prepared according to accepted scientific and technical standards consistent with requirements of the CEQA and all other pertinent reviewing agencies and organizations. This report will be updated to include the results of the efforts outlined above, and will also include an updated impacts analysis based on the final development plan. The budget for this task is based upon the analysis of one development plan. The cost of additional unforeseen analyses based on changes to the development plan, extensive edits, and/or out of scope work necessary due to comments from the project team, are not included in the cost for this task. Project Team Coordination and Management PCR biologists will be available to coordinate with the project team's engineers, hydrologists, and planners that are working on the project. The PCR Lead Biologist will be the day-to-day contact with City of Chino Hills and the project team, as needed, pertaining to the biological resources technical report and associated surveys. The Lead Biologist role will include ultimate accountability to City of Chino Hills for the successful completion of biological assignments on schedule, budget oversight, and for ultimate quality assurance and control of all deliverables. The Lead Biologist will be responsible for the day-to-day coordination and oversight of the biological resources technical report and associated surveys. Additionally, the Lead Biologist will be available to respond to requests for additional information. This task would also cover conference calls, project team meetings, follow-up meeting memos/minutes, and general coordination with City of Chino Hills or other project team members up to the budget amount in this task. This task assumes 25 hours of Lead Biologist time for project team coordination and management related to previous tasks, as needed. Additional meetings and any other out -of -scope services, as directed by the City of Chino Hills, will be billed on a time and materials basis in accordance with the attached rate schedule based. Conversely, time not used for coordination will not be billed. Biology Optional Tasks Conduct Tree Inventory and Prepare Report (Optional Task 9) A tree inventory has not been completed for the site and will be required for compliance with the City's Ordinance No. 250 on tree preservation (amended January 24, 2012). The tree inventory will include mapping of all regulatory -sized trees and assessments of their health within the limits of rough grading and a 200 foot buffer. The inventory will include the four native trees included in the ordinance, namely California sycamore (Platanus racemosa), California live Oak (Quercus agrifolia), California black walnut (juglans californica), and coastal scrub oak (Quercus berberidifolia), with trunks of four (4) inches in diameter at breast height (DBH), in addition to heritage trees as defined by the City ordinance. PCR will identify the species, assess their health conditions, and comment on the aesthetics of each tree, in addition to providing an analysis of proposed impacts to the trees. Page 5 of 24 To estimate densities of trees on the Project site in 2012, PCR collected tree count data in six representative polygons during the vegetation mapping update. From these counts, the number of trees per acre in both woodland areas (coast live oak and black walnut woodland) and outlier trees in non -woodland areas (coastal sage scrub areas where outlier coast live oaks and black walnuts were observed) were calculated. An approximate average of trees per acre in both woodland and non -woodland areas was calculated, totaling 32 trees per acre and 8 trees per acre, respectively. To estimate the number of trees that would need to be inventoried for compliance with the City ordinance, PCR overlaid the 2012 vegetation mapping onto the grading plans to calculate acreages of impacts to woodland and non -woodland areas using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The grading plans were provided as Computer Aided Design (CAD) files in February 2015. Based on this exercise, impacts within the Project grading footprint and the 200 -foot buffer would include approximately 68 acres of areas supporting trees, including 15.4 acres of woodland areas and 52.3 acres of non -woodland areas. This impact number decreased since the 2012 footprint by 116 acres (184 acres in 2012 to 68 acres in 2015). Applying the estimated tree densities plus a 15 percent contingency, and the acreage of areas potentially supporting trees as outlined above, a total of 1,048 trees were estimated within the proposed tree inventory area. It is assumed that two (2) teams of two (2) biologists during a seven (7) hour field window per day can inventory approximately 200 trees per day. Therefore, a total of 5.5 days would be required to inventory the estimated 1,048 trees. All trees assessed will be mapped in the field using Global Positioning System (GPS) devices that provide "resource grade" accuracy, with the addition of laser rangefinders, where feasible. Laser rangefinders allow GPS points to be taken for multiple trees from one location if there is a clear line of sight to the tree trunk, thereby potentially saving time. Depending on the physical conditions during data collection, such "resource grade" accuracy can range from less than a meter up to 5-10 meters from the tree's actual location. It should be noted that the "resource grade' information is not to be equated to "survey grade" information, which identifies/pinpoints the precise location of the tree using other specialized technology/devices. However, for purposes of mapping the trees within the context of providing a framework to determine potential impacts to these resources, "resource grade" mapping is widely accepted throughout the industry. Based on our field experience, there are certain areas on the Project site where satellite and cell reception is weak or non-existent. To improve the satellite reception, the use of external antennae is also assumed for seven of the field days. While the external antennae should help in weak reception areas, it is possible that reception may not be obtained at some locations. In these circumstances, field work may be slowed down and the accuracy of the location data will likely be lowered. The report will identify the lower accuracy data. Upon completion of the field work, a report will be prepared. The report will contain a complete listing of all trees inventoried on the Project site, as well as an assessment of the overall health and aesthetics of each tree. The report will also include a map showing the location of all trees inventoried on the Project site prepared using GIS, representative photographs of the trees, and an analysis of proposed impacts to the inventoried trees. The budget for this is based on an estimate of tree density using CAD data provided by the Project applicant in February 2015. Should it be determined that additional trees need to be inventoried based on a change in the CAD data, a greater number of trees on-site than estimated, and/or that inventory of the estimated trees takes longer due to site conditions beyond what was accounted for in this scope of work, additional budget would be required. Cultural Resources Assessment PCR will review the City contracted Cultural Resources Assessment to incorporate the technical information necessary to support the Draft EIR and to ensure that it meets the industry standard for CEQA-level cultural resources analyses. Page 6 of 24 Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis The State Office of Planning and research (OPR) published revised CEQA guidelines, effective on March 18, 2010, which requires a GHG analysis be prepared. PCR proposed to analyze GHG emissions in accordance with these revised guidelines. In general, the guidelines allow Lead Agencies to determine if a quantitative or qualitative analysis is most appropriate, and to establish specific significance criteria. PCR will prepare a discussion of the pertinent GHG statutes and regulations at the local, regional, state and federal levels. At this time, neither the SCAQMD nor the City has promulgated numeric project -level CEQA significance thresholds for GHG emissions applicable to the proposed project. The SCAQMD has provided draft thresholds with the intent of capturing 90 percent of projects for implementing GHG reduction measures and mitigation. PCR will perform the GHG analysis utilizing the draft SCAQMD thresholds and by demonstrating that the project is consistent with GHG reducing goals established by the CalGreen Building Code and California's Global Warming Solutions Act (AB 32). PCR will calculate direct and indirect emissions that would result from construction and operation of the proposed project, including emissions from energy usage and mobile sources, and will prepare an analysis in accordance with the latest guidelines including the CalGreen Building Code. In addition, PCR will also provide qualitative discussion of those project features that will help reduce GHG emissions. Emission reduction measures will be calculated using guidance from the California Air Pollution Control Officer's Association (CAPCOA). GHG emissions are, by their nature, a cumulative issue. The City of Chino Hills General Plan Update Greenhouse Gas Study has analyzed cumulative impacts on a per capita basis. Thus, to assess the project's potential cumulative impacts, PCR will compare project -related per capita emissions to the thresholds used in the General Plan Update Greenhouse Gas Study. PCR will also qualitatively discuss the project's conformance to relevant City and State ordinances and goals. PCR will provide mitigation measures, if needed, to address any significant GHG impacts identified. PCR will also qualitatively discuss the project's conformance to relevant City and State GHG reduction ordinances and goals, including the San Bernardino County Regional Greenhouse Gas Reduction Plan. The CalGreen Building Code specifies GHG reducing measures required for new development within the State. Such measures include energy efficiency standards exceeding Title 24 requirements, renewable energy usage requirements, shade trees and yard waste diversion. PCR will prepare a qualitative analysis of the proposed project and consistency with the CalGreen Building Code. PCR will prepare one draft version of the Greenhouse Gas technical report, and one final version in response to a consolidated set of review comments from the City or other interested parties or agencies. This scope assumes that details regarding construction schedule and operation of the proposed project are provided by the City. If these data are not known, PCR can assist in developing this information, for a scope and fee to be negotiated later. Noise Study As the proposed project has the potential to increase ambient noise levels on a temporary (e.g., during construction) and/or long-term (e.g., operations) basis, the issue of noise will be addressed in the Technical Report. PCR staff will prepare an evaluation of potential noise impacts associated with construction activities, surface transportation, and other aspects of project operations that are noise intensive and that have the potential to impact neighboring noise sensitive land uses. In addition, PCR staff will also prepare an evaluation of potential impacts on the project from sources of noise in the existing sound environment. The adequacy of building sound isolation to support attainment of applicable interior noise standards for residential uses and the potential for adverse noise effects related to existing sound environment will be addressed. Based on our preliminary review of local conditions, noise -sensitive uses in the Project vicinity would include existing nearby residential uses west of the project site. Page 7 of 24 The scope of services for the noise analysis will include the following: (1) survey noise -sensitive land uses, existing noise sources, and features affecting noise transference in the project area; (2) conduct noise monitoring at two locations 24 -hours (one midweek day) and up to two short-term monitoring during peak traffic hours to establish ambient noise levels in proximity to potentially affected noise sensitive land uses; (3) identify and describe relevant local plans, regulations, ordinances, criteria, and guidelines associated with noise; (4) estimate construction related noise levels at the nearby noise sensitive uses and determine noise impacts; (5) evaluate project operational noise from project related vehicular traffic at nearby existing roadway segments and on-site stationary noise sources based on data from the project traffic analysis using computer noise prediction models that incorporate Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) traffic noise model (FHWARD-77-108); (6) provide an analysis of vibration impacts associated with use of heavy-duty equipment during construction of the project; (7) evaluate the potential noise impacts from the sound environment resulting from future or existing off-site land uses (i.e. traffic on roadways) based on the City/State Building Code; and (8) identify potential mitigation measures, where feasible and necessary. The scope of services for the noise section does not include post construction noise and vibration monitoring and analysis. Traffic Impact Analysis The following scope of work describes and illustrates in detail the methods and processes proposed by Iteris in preparation of the project -specific Traffic Impact Analysis. Iteris staff will meet with the City of Chino Hills staff to finalize the scope, methodology, and content of the traffic impact and parking analysis for the project. This meeting will address such items as: methodology for determining trip generation, trip distribution patterns, project site access, and other methodological issues. The proposed project site is located along a Caltrans facility, Carbon Canyon Road (SR -142). Thus, coordination with Caltrans may be necessary as well. Preliminary Analysis Iteris has conducted some preliminary analysis of the project scope. Weekday trip generation calculations using Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) Trip Generation (9th Edition) rates for the Single -Family Residential land use category are shown in Table 1 below. As shown in the table, it is expected that construction of the proposed project would generate approximately 80 a.m. peak hour trips, 107 p.m. peak hour trips, and 1,019 daily trips. Table 1 — Preliminary Weekdav Proiect Trip Generation Based on the preliminary trip generation estimates and trip distribution assumptions, as well input from City staff during the kick-off meeting, it is estimated that the following thirteen (13) intersections in the vicinity of the project site would be required for a.m. and p.m. peak hour Level of Service (LOS) analysis: 1. Carbon Canyon Road/Canyon Hills Road; 2. Carbon Canyon Road/Chino Hills Parkway; Page 8 of 24 TRIP ENDS GENERATED WEEKDAY AM WEEKDAY PM LAND USE SIZE PEAK HOUR PEAK HOUR DAILY IN OUT I TOTAL IN OUT TOTAL Single -Family Residential 107 dwelling units Rate 25% 75% 0.75 63% 37% 1.00 9.52 Trips P 20 60 80 67 47 107 1,019 Based on the preliminary trip generation estimates and trip distribution assumptions, as well input from City staff during the kick-off meeting, it is estimated that the following thirteen (13) intersections in the vicinity of the project site would be required for a.m. and p.m. peak hour Level of Service (LOS) analysis: 1. Carbon Canyon Road/Canyon Hills Road; 2. Carbon Canyon Road/Chino Hills Parkway; Page 8 of 24 3. Peyton Drive/Chino Hills Parkway; 4. Pipeline Avenue/Chino Hills Parkway; 5. SR -71 Southbound Ramps/Chino Hills Parkway; 6. SR -71 Northbound Ramps/Chino Hills Parkway; 7. SR -57 Southbound Ramps/Lambert Road (within City of Brea); 8. SR -57 Northbound Ramps/Lambert Road (within City of Brea); 9. Carbon Canyon Road/Canon Lane; 10. Carbon Canyon Road/Fairway-Ginseng Lane; 11. Carbon Canyon Road/Olinda Place (within City of Brea); 12. Carbon Canyon Road/Ruby Street (within City of Brea); and 13. Carbon Canyon Road -Lambert Road/Valencia Avenue (within City of Brea). It should be noted that five of the proposed study intersections are in the City of Brea, as it is expected that project traffic would utilize SR -57 to access areas within Orange County. Since the proposed project is located along a Caltrans facility and would potentially load more than 100 peak hour trips onto this facility, a Caltrans analysis impact section would be provided in the report. It is not anticipated that a Congestion Management Program (CMP) analysis would be required based on the location of the project with respect to the CMP intersections within the City. For the purposes of scope and budget, it is assumed that new weekday a.m. and p.m. peak period counts would be collected at all thirteen (13) study intersections. In addition, based on input from City staff, new 24-hour Average Daily Traffic (ADT) counts would be collected at three (3) locations in the vicinity of the proposed project. The ADT counts would be used to identify the peak periods of traffic in the area for which to collect the intersection counts the following week(s). The ADT counts at the three locations would also be used to determine an average'peak hour -to -daily volume ratio to calculate ADT volumes throughout the study area to be used in the other environmental studies. Based on the scoping meeting, Iteris will prepare a draft Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) and submit it to the City for approval. This document would include: ■ Study area (final list of study intersections and roadway segments); ■ Trip generation methodologies; ■ Project trip distribution; ■ Future volume development approach; and ■ Traffic operations analysis methodologies (Chino Hills and Caltrans). Deliverables: ■ MOU with City of Chino Hills Page 9 of 24 Existing Intersection Traffic Analysis Utilizing the traffic counts collected as part of the previous task, existing intersection levels of service will be calculated and operating conditions assessed. All study intersections will be analyzed during weekday peak hour conditions, unless otherwise directed by the City. Existing intersection operating conditions will be quantified using the Highway Capacity Manual (HCM) methodology. Iteris will use "TRAFFIX", a localized traffic analysis software program, to analyze existing traffic operations and to assign cumulative and project - related traffic volumes to the roadway network in later tasks. TRAFFIX is a versatile traffic impact analysis model, which allows analysis of intersections using several operations and planning methodologies, plus analysis of both signalized and un -signalized intersections. In addition to existing intersection analysis, existing bike, pedestrian, and transit facilities within the study area will be identified. Existing Plus Project Intersection Traffic Analysis Iteris will utilize trip generation estimates for the project to develop existing plus project conditions. Trip distribution and trip assignment of project -related trips would-be based on information contained in the MOU. The project trips will be assigned to the study intersections using a localized traffic impact model completed on the TRAFFIX software system. Intersection LOS including the project will be determined and compared to existing conditions using the methodologies provided in the City's guidelines. Any significant impacts forecast to be caused by the project will be highlighted. Mitigation Measures Iteris will identify feasible mitigation measures to address any significant traffic impacts forecast to be caused by the project. Recommended physical improvements will be evaluated to show how they reduce the impact to less than significant. Any recommended improvements will also be assessed to determine if any secondary impacts to other modes of transportation would result with implementation of the improvement. An example of a secondary impact could be a reduction in sidewalk width or the loss of on -street parking as a result of roadway widening to mitigate a traffic -related impact. Opening Year and Horizon Year without Project Intersection Traffic Analysis Opening year and Horizon year traffic conditions with cumulative development will be determined using trips from the identified cumulative projects expected to be built by each analysis year plus an ambient traffic growth rate (e.g.,1 to 2% per year) consistent with the recently completed City of Chino Hills General Plan. Operating conditions for both Opening year and Horizon year (approximately 15 -year horizon) will be quantified using the HCM method of intersection analysis. Intersections that are forecast to experience unacceptable levels of service, based on the LOS Standards provided in the City's guidelines, will be highlighted. Opening Year and Horizon Year with Project Intersection Traffic Analysis Iteris will utilize the same trip generation estimates and project trip distribution to assign project trips to the roadway network for the two future year scenarios. Levels of service including the project will be determined and compared to Opening year and Horizon year conditions without the project using the methodologies provided in the City's guidelines. Any significant impacts forecast to be caused by the project will be highlighted. Mitigation Measures Iteris will identify feasible mitigation measures to address any significant traffic impacts forecast to be caused by the project in both future year scenarios. Recommended physical improvements will be evaluated Page 10 of 24 to show how they reduce the impact to less than significant. Any recommended improvements will also be assessed to determine if any secondary impacts to other modes of transportation would result with implementation of the improvement. Fair Share Contribution The project fair share cost contribution would be calculated for any mitigation measures recommended at intersections forecast to be significantly impacted by the proposed project in either future year conditions. The fair share contribution would be the percentage of project traffic added during the worst case peak hour divided by the total growth in traffic between the future year with project and existing conditions. Documentation and Response to Comments A draft traffic impact analysis documenting the methodologies, findings, and recommendations of the analysis would be submitted to the City/Caltrans for review. Iteris will respond to one set of consolidated comments from City/Caltrans staff and prepare a draft report for inclusion in the EIR. Upon public review of the EIR, Iteris will respond to one set of consolidated public comments and prepare a final report. Deliverables: ■ Draft Traffic Impact Analysis document; ■ Response to City comments;' ■ Response to Public comments; ■ Final Traffic Impact Analysis document. Meetings Iteris will attend up to two (2) public hearings in addition to the kick-off meeting discussed above. Additional meetings would be attended, as needed or requested by the City, on a "time and materials" basis. Visual Simulations (Optional Task 10) PCR has retained KTU+A to prepare project -specific visual simulations for the proposed development, should the City determine that visual simulations are warranted to support the analysis of impacts to aesthetics, views, and scenic resources in the Draft EIR. If requested by the City, KTU+A would perform the following tasks in the preparation of visual simulations. Project Setting and Viewshed Aerials will be acquired from existing sources and registered within a project area base map file in GIS. Plans will then be acquired and reviewed. Once these plans have been worked into a topographic map of the area, a study limit will be determined. Typically, a 1 -mile limit will be set within the computer viewshed model. The results of the viewshed model will identify the viewshed limits of the project site, as well as a composite for all possible project elements. Once these steps have been completed, fieldwork will verify the limits of the viewshed. Unique visual resources including view corridors will be noted, mapped and photographed. Project Modeling It is assumed that the project engineers, planners or architects have a CAD or GIS version of the proposed project. Since it is not likely that all elements will be available in fully editable three-dimensional digital files, the proposal assumes that no 3D is available, but that all major project features are in 2D. These 2D files will be used to extrude the building footprints and other major site features into 3D mass models. Detailing of Page 11 of 24 landscape architectural treatments and building architectural style will be limited to the vantage points of the five key views selected for final simulations. Key Views for Visual Assessment The initial fieldwork will also identify candidate keyviews that represent the most critical and highly visible views of the proposed elements. It is anticipated that 10-15 candidate keyviews will be identified for further analysis and review. Up to 10 of the candidate key views will have a computer-generated model produced for it taken from the same vantage point as the keyview photographed in the field. These wireframe or mass models will be merged with the photograph. Once all candidate key views models have been produced, a matrix will be generated comparing the advantage and disadvantages to selecting the candidate keyviews for full visual simulations. A meeting with City staff and PCR will be held to review these candidate keyviews to reach consensus on the five top keyviews for visual simulations. Visual Simulations Model elements, site features and landforms originating from ESRI Arescene and Visibility Tools (Spatial Analyst and 3D Analyst) will be exported into SktechUp. The elements will be further extruded and/or replaced with more detailed models of the proposed project improvements. The keyview coordinates will be used to set up a static export of the computer model. This export will be imported into a layering scheme within Photoshop. Detail, shading, and interceding elements will be added. Five simulations will be produced (with the option for additional simulations as needed). The process will result in photos as seen from all 15 candidate key views, a simple simulation of the top 10 of these candidate key views, and then full detail simulations of five (5) key views. Task 3: Prepare Initial Study and Notice of Preparation PCR will begin preparation of the Initial Study package that is required by the City. The Initial Study package will consist of the City's Initial Study Checklist accompanied by specific explanations of the checklist determinations and the project description described above. The Initial Study checklist and Explanation of Checklist Determinations will identify issues that will be analyzed in the EIR and, importantly, substantiate why other issues will not require further study. The term "checklist" connotes direct questions simply answered by checking empty boxes. This image does not describe the Initial Study Checklist, which is comprised of many technical questions in 18 broad categories, each of which must be addressed with a data and/or logic based analysis. For each environmental issue addressed in the Initial Study Checklist, it will be determined whether the project would result in no impact, a less than significant impact, a less than significant impact with mitigation or a potentially significant impact. The EIR will address in detail the issues for which a potentially significant impact is identified. Based on the City's RFP, further research, it is anticipated that the Initial Study will indicate that further analysis in an EIR is warranted for the following environmental issues: aesthetics, air quality, biological resources, cultural resources, geology and soils, greenhouse gas emissions, hazards and hazardous materials, hydrology and water quality, land use and planning, noise, population and housing, public services, recreation, transportation/traffic, utilities and service systems, and mandatory findings of significance. Once drafted, PCR will submit the Initial Study package to the City for review. Upon review by the City, PCR will make any necessary changes to the Initial Study package. It is assumed that there will be moderate revisions to the Initial Study. Included in such revisions may be modifications to the list of environmental issues to be discussed in the Draft EIR. PCR assumes that # round(s) of City comments will be provided. As part of this task, PCR will also prepare a Notice of Preparation (NOP) of a Draft EIR for review by the City. In addition, per the City's RFP, PCR assumes that two (2) public scoping meetings will be held and thus, a Page 12 of 24 Notice of a Public Scoping Meeting will be incorporated into the NOP. In accordance with CEQA and City requirements, the NOP/Notice of Public Scoping Meeting will include a brief description of the project, a list of the probable environmental effects of the project, a conceptual site plan, a copy of the radius map and the date, times and locations of the two public scoping meetings. PCR will need assistance from the City in coordinating the scoping meeting location and radius map and associated mailing list. Once the NOP/Notice of Public Scoping meeting is signed by City staff, PCR will distribute the NOP/Notice of Public Scoping meeting via certified mail to begin the 30 -day public comment period. During the NOP comment period, the Initial Study will also be made available by City/ staff for public review. Deliverables: 21 copies of the Initial Study 21 copies of the of NOP 60 CDs of the Initial Study Package in PDF format Task 4: Prepare Screencheck, Administrative EIR PCR will prepare a Screencheck Draft EIR that will analyze the project's potential environmental impacts. This task will represent the largest part of PCR's effort in completing the environmental review process for the project. PCR will design a Draft EIR that will reflect the scope of issues determined by the Initial Study, additional relevant issues raised within NOP comments, and how to approach key environmental issue areas. PCR will prepare an outline of contents of the Draft EIR and submit it to the City for review and approval, which will serve as the basis for the organization of the document. The Draft EIR will include all statutory sections required by CEQA, including a summary, project description, environmental setting, and impact analyses for each environmental issue to be addressed that will include mitigation measures and an analysis of cumulative effects. The EIR will also address areas of controversy, effects found not to be significant, growth inducement, alternatives, significant irreversible environmental effects, significant and unavoidable environmental effects, references, and organizations and persons consulted. PCR assumes that up to four (4) alternatives, including a No Project Alternative as required under CEQA, will be addressed in the Draft EIR. PCR will work with the City to create a comprehensive set of project objectives within the Project Description and to identify alternatives to the project. Project objectives play a key role in the CEQA process as they are the basis for considering or rejecting alternatives to the proposed project. Alternatives to the project are of primary importance in an EIR as they are required to be included under CEQA as a way to reduce or eliminate the significant impacts of a project and are also carefully reviewed and considered by the public and decision -makers. The scope of the environmental impact analyses in the Draft EIR will be determined by the Initial Study and may be modified to include additional topics based on comments received during the NOP comment period. Based on PCR's understanding of the development, our long-standing history of experience in preparing EIRs in the region, we anticipate that the Draft EIR will analyze the following environmental issue areas. ■ Aesthetics/Visual Resources (aesthetics, views, and light & glare) ■ Air Quality ■ Biological Resources ■ Cultural Resources ■ Geology/Soils ■ Global Climate Change/Greenhouse Gas Analysis ■ Hazards and Hazardous Materials ■ Hydrology/Water Quality ■ Land Use/Planning ■ Noise Page 13 of 24 ■ Population/Housing ■ Public Services (Recreation, Police, Fire, Schools, and Libraries) ■ Transportation/Traffic (Traffic, Circulation, and Access) ■ Utilities/Service Systems (Water, Sewer, Solid Waste) The project team's analytic approach and scope for each of the environmental issues is presented below. Aesthetics/Visual Resources Given the proposed intensification of land uses on-site, as well as the proximity of light- and glare -sensitive land uses in the project area (particularly the residential uses in adjacent communities), PCR will evaluate the potential impacts of the proposed development with regard to aesthetics, views, and light/glare. The aesthetics analysis will be illustrated through the use of photographs and graphic 'illustrations, including visual simulations, which would be prepared by PCR's subconsultant, KTU+A. KTU+A's scope of work for the preparation of visual simulations is provided above. The analysis of impacts on aesthetic resources will incorporate the following: a description of the existing visual quality of the site and surrounding areas; a description of any valued focal or panoramic views of aesthetic resources; a description of relevant regulations, policies and guidelines governing aesthetic resources; and an evaluation of impacts with an emphasis on the potential for the project to introduce features that would detract from the aesthetic quality of the area or conflict with applicable design guidelines. Based on the project site's hillside location and the multi -story building heights, the new residential units will be visible from beyond the immediate project vicinity. Thus, the analysis of views will need to be comprehensive. This analysis will focus on views of aesthetic resources that may be obstructed. The analysis will address views from public and private locations separately public policy and case law suggest that private views are provided little regulatory protection. However, it will be important to include an analysis of view impacts from representative private locations. In addition, the analysis will address cumulative view impacts of the project together with other related projects in the area. Additionally, given the intensification of land uses on the project site, it is expected that the project will increase light and glare effects based on the introduction of residential and other structural lighting and addition of windows and reflective surfaces associated with new buildings. As such, PCR will evaluate the potential for new light and glare sources to adversely affect surrounding and other nearby land uses. Air Quality and Global Climate Change The proposed project would result in the construction of a residential community, which would involve the construction and operation of new facilities, and therefore would result in short- and long-term increases in air pollutant emissions. Given the location of the project site within the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB), as well as the proximity of sensitive land uses (i.e., residential uses to the west, north and east), an evaluation of potential impacts related to air quality is necessary in the EIR. Based on the project -specific Air Quality Study and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis, described above, PCR will evaluate the potential impacts of the proposed project relative to air quality and global climate change, including construction -related impacts, operational impacts (both stationary- and mobile -source emissions), Air Quality Management Plan (AQMP) and GHG reduction plan consistency impacts, and odor impacts. Mitigation measures will be recommended, as appropriate, to address potentially significant impacts in the Air Quality and Greenhouse Gas Emissions sections of the EIR. Page 14 of 24 Biological Resources As discussed above, PCR will perform a comprehensive update to a previously prepared BRA and associated studies. Following our field investigations and BRA update, PCR will prepare the appropriate EIR documentation. Existing biological resource conditions will be described, including plant communities and habitats on site, special -status species, jurisdictional waters and wetlands, oak tree resources, wildlife movement, and the site's significance, if any, to regional biological resources. The EIR section to be prepared will analyze potential impacts according to thresholds of significance approved by the. City. Impacts analyzed will include potential direct, indirect and cumulative effects. For those impacts determined to be potentially significant, enforceable and effective mitigation strategies will be recommended and discussed; and, conclusions regarding any potentially significant unavoidable impacts will be presented. It should be noted that at the request of the City, as noted above, a secondary emergency vehicle access road is contemplated as an access option for the project, which requires additional work not originally assumed in our scope of work. The additional effort that has been included in this task includes more detailed data collection and/or the coordination for choosing a suitable location for the access road and discussions with the applicant/design team as there are sensitive resources in that area including walnut woodland, native grassland, drainages, and coastal sage scrub habitat that could be suitable for gnatcatcher), which could be avoided to the extent feasible. In order to account for unknown details regarding the specific location(s) of the access road(s), this scope of work also assumes the following efforts: 1. A field survey to do fine -scale vegetation mapping along the proposed alignment(s) (1 day for 2 staff members) 2. Two field meetings 3. Post -field data processing to update the vegetation map and assess any alternative routes in GIS (assumed 10 hours) 4. Additional time for the focused plant surveys if needed to make a more detailed search for sensitive plants (assumed 4 hours for each of the 2 sensitive plant surveys). 5. Coordination with the City and Fire Department (assumed 10 hours). Cultural Resources (Archaeological and Paleontological Resources) Despite the lack of known sites on the project property, there is potential for the presence of archaeological and paleontological resources that could be adversely affected by the construction of the proposed improvements. As such, PCR will evaluate the potential impacts to undiscovered archaeological and paleontological resources resulting from the proposed project, based on information provided in an archaeological and paleontological resources assessment prepared for the applicant under separate contract, as discussed above. PCR will then prepare the cultural resources EIR Section based on the archaeological and paleontological resources assessment and will recommend mitigation measures to reduce impacts to cultural resources to a less than significant level, if necessary. The cost for this task assumes that there are no historical resources on the project site that require evaluation. Geology/Soils Given the proposed intensification of development on-site, as well as the hillside location of the project site, the EIR will require a comprehensive evaluation of geology and soils. The City's RFP indicates that the project applicant has prepared a site-specific Geotechnical Report for the proposed project which will serve as the basis for the assessment of geology and soils impacts in the EIR. Following review of the Geotechnical Report by City Engineering Department staff, PCR will incorporate the results, conclusions, and Page 15 of 24 recommendations contained in the geotechnical study into the Geology and Soils section of the EIR. The evaluation in the EIR will focus on seismic and soil conditions, including geotechnical hazards, seismicity and the potential for liquefaction, subsidence, landslides, and erosion. Hazards and Hazardous Materials PCR will evaluate impacts relating to hazard and hazardous materials in the Hazards and Hazardous Materials section of the EIR, based on the applicant -prepared Phase 1 ESA or HMA. Based on the Phase 1 ESA or HMA, which would be reviewed by City Engineering Department staff, as discussed above, the analysis presented in the EIR will address the potential risks to human health and the environment associated with hazardous materials due to exposure to residual concentrations of chemicals that may be present in site soils and/or groundwater at the site, and will also evaluate potential health risks associated with long-term operation of the project with regard to hazardous materials. Additionally, given the hillside location and undeveloped nature of the site adjacent to wildlands, this section will also evaluate impacts related to wildland fire hazards, which will be based in part on the applicant -provided Fuel Modification Report prepared for the project, which is assumed to be adequate to support the analysis presented in the Draft EIR. Mitigation measures will be provided to address potentially significant impacts, if necessary, based on the recommendations provided in the Phase 1 ESA/HMA and Fuel Modification Report for the affected property. Hydrology and Water Quality The proposed project could result in potential impacts to runoff flow rates, drainage patterns, and surface and groundwater quality due to future development activities and the increase the overall land use intensity, and therefore impacts associated with hydrology and water quality will be evaluated in the EIR. The project - specific and Water Quality Management Plan ,(WQMP) prepared by the applicant's consultant will serve as the basis for the discussion of hydrology and water quality impacts in the EIR. In order to verify the accuracy and completeness of these documents with respect to applicable stormwater regulations, City Engineering Department staff will perform a technical peer review of the hydrology/drainage study and WQMP. PCR assumes that City staff will peer review the applicant's hydrology and water quality technical studies to ensure all major hydrology and water quality technical issues are addressed including flooding, 100 -year conveyance, existing versus proposed hydrology conditions, hydromodification analysis, Low Impact Development (LID) hierarchy for water quality and conformance with the MS4 Storm Water Permit. Based on the analysis, conclusions, and recommendations contained in the hydrology/drainage study and WQMP, PCR will assess potential impacts in the Hydrology and Water Quality section of the EIR and provide appropriate mitigation measures, as necessary. Land Use and Planning As noted previously, the proposed project includes requests for the approval of Tentative Tract Map 18869 and Specific Plan 13-01. PCR will assess land use impacts of these requested approvals and entitlements and also evaluate the project's consistency with land use and zoning designations, local and regional plans, policies and guidelines applicable to the site. The analysis of impacts relative to land use and planning will incorporate the following: Land use and zoning designations will be described and mapped specifically for the project site and for the surrounding areas; Applicable local, regional, State, and federal plans, policies, regulations and guidelines will be summarized; Land use compatibility of the new structures associated with the project will be discussed relative to past and present site activities and adjacent uses; Page 16 of 24 ■ Thresholds of Significance will be defined for land use impacts; ■ The compatibility of proposed land uses and activities with surrounding areas will be assessed; ■ The project's consistency with General Plan, zoning designations, and relevant standards for setbacks, building heights, and the provision of open space and landscaping will be evaluated. As the project would increase on-site building heights (as no development currently exists), an important focus of the analysis will be on how the proposed project would affect the scale and character of the surrounding area as it exists and as anticipated in relevant plans, and how the project would meet the community benefits needs of the surrounding area. Inconsistencies with applicable local, regional, state or federal land use policies and programs will be identified; ■ A comprehensive analysis will be conducted of project consistency with relevant goals and policies within the General Plan and the City's Development Code, other relevant general plan elements, and other applicable City plans and policies. Regional plans of interest and merit, such as SCAG's Regional Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategy (RTP/SCS) will also be addressed and cross references will be made to other sections of the document which address project consistency with the San Bernardino County Congestion Management Plan, and the SCAQMD's Air Quality Management Plan; ■ Determinations of significance will be based on instances where there are conflicts with plans or policies that also translate to physical impacts on the environment based on potential impacts associated with traffic, air quality, noise, and other topical areas of analysis; and ■ Mitigation measures will be identified, if necessary, to address significant physical impacts on land use. Noise As the proposed project has the potential to increase ambient noise levels on a temporary (e.g., during construction) and/or long-term (e.g., operations) basis, the issue of noise will be addressed in the Draft EIR. Noise associated with short-term construction activities and long-term operation of the proposed improvements will be quantified and impacts evaluated based on established thresholds, based on a Noise Study prepared by PCR staff, as discussed above. PCR will prepare an EIR Noise section based on this technical study, and include the following: thresholds of significance for noise impacts, identification of existing noise -sensitive land uses, characteristics of ambient noise levels, identification of project construction and operation noise impacts in relation to applicable significance criteria, and assessment of potential impacts related to groundborne noise and vibration. Mitigation measures will be provided, as appropriate, to address potentially significant impacts. Population, Housing, and Employment The project, as proposed, would result in the construction of new residential uses on the property, which is currently vacant land. Since the proposed project would entail intensification of on-site land uses with new housing units and open space, and the associated direct population growth, employment growth, and increase in housing stock, PCR will evaluate the potential for the proposed project to result in impacts on population, housing, and employment within the City. PCR's evaluation of the project's potential impacts on population, housing, and employment will: ■ Identify the existing population, housing, and employment conditions with reliance on the General Plan, other City sources, the most recent available Census data, and associated projections for population, housing, and employment, including those provided by the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG); Page 17 of 24 ■ Describe the regulatory provisions and City policies related to population, housing, and employment, as appropriate; ■ Define Thresholds of Significance based on applicable guidelines; ■ Evaluate the proposed project's effects relative to projected population, housing, and employment to determine any conflicts related to housing supply or growth, particularly those that would translate to significant physical impacts on the environment; and ■ Recommend mitigation measures, to the extent feasible, where significant impacts are identified. The level of significance after implementation of mitigation measures will also be discussed. Public Services (Police, Fire, Schools, Parks/Recreation, and Libraries) As the proposed project is anticipated to result in direct housing growth, the proposed project would also result in direct population growth and associated increases in demands for public services, including fire protection, police protection, school facilities, parks/recreational facilities, and libraries. As such, PCR will evaluate potential impacts to these services in the Public Services section of the EIR based on input from the potentially effected agencies and departments. PCR's approach for each of these topics in presented below: Fire Protection PCR's evaluation of the project's potential impacts on fire protection services will: • Describe the location, response times, staffing, and equipment levels for the fire stations that serve the site; ■ Discuss any existing constraints to service and relevant plans or proposals for new fire stations or increases in staffing and equipment; ■ Define Thresholds of Significance for determining impacts to fire protection services; ■ Evaluate the project's conformance with regulations and standards for such features as road widths, hydrant fire flow, and emergency response times. Additionally, in consultation with the fire department, assess the increase in demand for fire protection and the Chino Valley Fire Department's ability to serve the project and maintain adequate levels of service; and ■ If mitigation measures are required to address significant impacts, they will be developed with input from the Fire Department, focusing on design modifications or requirements for additional staffing, equipment, or facilities needed to serve the project. Police Services PCR's evaluation of the project's potential impacts on police services will: ■ Identify the location, police beats, facilities, staffing, equipment levels, and response times for the police stations serving the project site; ■ Discuss any existing constraints to police services in the project area or relevant plans for new facilities, staffing and equipment; ■ Define Thresholds of Significance to determine impacts on police services; ■ Based on consultation with the police department, assess the increase in demand for police services and the ability of the Chino Hills Police Department and California Highway Patrol to serve the project and maintain adequate levels of service; and Page 18 of 24 ■ Develop mitigation measures with input from the police department to address any significant impacts on police services. Schools PCR's evaluation of the project's potential impacts on public schools will: ■ Identify the name, location, size, capacity and enrollment of the public schools serving the project area in consultation with the Chino Valley Unified School District; ■ Summarize applicable local, regional and state plans, policies and regulations, including school impact fees under Senate Bill 50; ■ Discuss any relevant plans for new or expanded school facilities; ■ Define Thresholds of Significance focusing on the potential for the project and its effect on schools to result in physical impacts on the environment; ■ Quantify enrollment generated by the project in relation to existing and planned school capacities and identify any physical impacts on schools associated with school construction and/or other project effects; and ■ Develop mitigation measures if significant impacts are identified that would not be mitigated through payment of school impact fees. Library Services PCR's evaluation of project's potential impacts on library services will: ■ Identify the location of the public library(ies) serving the project area, the size and capacity of the facility(ies), and its service population. Relevant facility or service constraints will be identified along with any existing requirements for library impact fees; ■ Define Thresholds of Significance for determining impacts on libraries; ■ Evaluate potential impacts on library services and facilities in consultation with the San Bernardino Public Library; and ■ Develop mitigation measures, if necessary, to address significant impacts on library services. Parks/Recreation PCR will evaluate the proposed project's impact on local and regional parks and recreational facilities within the City of Chino Hills and surrounding jurisdictions, as appropriate, based in part on input from the City's Community Services Department. Transportation/Traffic The proposed project will increase on-site traffic generation, which could result in on- and off-site impacts to affected intersections and roadways, including Carbon Canyon Road (SR -142), a State highway located adjacent to the project site, which would provide all vehicular access to the property. Therefore, PCR will document the potential for the proposed project to result in transportation, circulation and parking impacts (including construction -related and operational impacts) in the EIR based on the analyses and findings provided in the Traffic Impact Analysis prepared by Iteris. The Traffic/Circulation section of the EIR will summarize the traffic study and will evaluate intersection and roadway impacts associated with the addition of project -generated traffic and . assess site access and related circulation issues (e.g., safety issues and hazards related to proposed circulation improvements including vehicular and pedestrian access, and Page 19 of 24 parking). Mitigation measures will be provided to address potentially significant impacts, based on the recommendations contained in the Traffic Impact Analysis. Utilities and Service Systems (Water, Wastewater, and Solid Waste) Water It is anticipated that the project's residential growth would not generate a water demand that would meet the thresholds requiring the preparation of a Water Supply Assessment (WSA) pursuant to Senate Bill 610 and a Water Availability Assessment (WAA) pursuant to Senate Bill 221 (effective January 1, 2002 and codified in California Water Code Section 10910 et seq.). As such, a WSA and WAA are not included in this scope of work. The analysis of utilities will address the impact to water supplies and water infrastructure at and near the project site. Based on technical input from the applicant's civil engineer or another consultant that is sufficient to support an adequate CEQA analysis, the EIR will describe the local water distribution system and evaluate whether on- and off-site water infrastructure and supply sources can adequately accommodate the demand for water generated by the project. If off-site infrastructure improvements are needed, it is assumed they will be defined as part of the project or as mitigation proposed by the applicant's civil engineer. Wastewater Since the proposed project would increase on-site water use, wastewater generation would also increase, which could result in adverse effects on existing wastewater conveyance and treatment infrastructure. PCR's evaluation of the project's potential impacts on wastewater will be based on technical data to be provided by the applicant's civil engineer or another consultant that is sufficient to support an adequate CEQA analysis. Based on this technical data, the EIR will identify and describe existing infrastructure, current and forecasted wastewater treatment capacity, and any constraints to treatment and conveyance systems that would affect the project. If off-site infrastructure improvements are needed, it is assumed they will be defined as part of the project or as mitigation proposed by the applicant's civil engineer. Solid Waste The analysis of project impacts on solid waste will begin with an identification of the location, classification, and projected capacity of landfills that would receive solid waste generated by the project. Relevant local solid waste and recycling policies will also be identified. The analysis will then identify and calculate the types of waste and debris that would be generated by construction activities, and the amount of solid waste that would be generated during project operations. The amount of solid waste generated during both construction and operation of the project will then be compared with projected landfill capacity to determine whether adequate landfill capacity exists. The analysis will also evaluate the consistency of the project's waste diversion and recycling procedures with AB939 goals. PCR will submit the Screencheck Draft EIR to the City for review. Based on our experience, we anticipate that one round of City comments will need to be incorporated before sending a proof Draft EIR copy to the City for final review and comment. Deliverables: Sample outline of the sections and format of the Administrative Draft 10 copies of the Administrative Draft EIR (including technical appendices) One (1) digital copy in PDF format for staff distribution Page 20 of 24 Task 5: Prepare Draft EIR Upon approval of the proof copy by the City, PCR will produce the Draft EIR and .prepare a Notice of Completion and a Notice of Availability. PCR will assist in the distribution of the Draft EIR to a list of agencies and organizations agreed to by the City. That list will include the State Clearinghouse, the County Clerk, Responsible Agencies, local libraries, and other interested parties including the nearby homeowners' associations (as applicable). PCR will also send copies of the Notice of Availability to all of the names within the owners and occupants' lists that accompany the radius map, individuals who commented on the NOP or attended the scoping meeting, as well as other individuals and agencies from a list provided by the City. PCR will also prepare files for posting the Draft EIR on the City's website and produce CDs of the Draft EIR for City distribution. Deliverables: ■ 25 copies of the Draft EIR for Public Review ■ 75 CDs of digital copies of the Draft EIR in PDF format ■ Notice of Completion Task 6: Prepare Final EIR At the close of the public review period for the Draft EIR, PCR will coordinate with the City to obtain all public comments. PCR will review the comments and meet with the City to discuss issues raised and establish an approach for responding to comments. After consultation with the City and subconsultants, as appropriate, regarding the issues raised, PCR will prepare a Screencheck Final EIR. The Screencheck Final EIR will include: a summary of the project and its associated impacts; corrections and additions to the Draft EIR; a list of persons, organizations, and public agencies commenting on the Draft EIR; comments submitted regarding the Draft EIR and responses prepared to address those comments; copies of the Draft EIR comment letters; and a Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program. In addition, it is anticipated that PCR may need assistance from the applicant, Chino Hills Country Club, and the project's other consultants with regard to comments that are more political in nature or that are specific to the design of the project or the content of technical reports prepared by others. As discussed in more detail below, PCR can only speculate as to the extent of public comment regarding the Draft EIR. We have assumed that a moderate level of public comments will be submitted to the City requiring responses, and thus we have budgeted for up to 100 staff hours (or $13,430) to prepare the first draft responses to comments. As discussed in the Cost Estimate section below, PCR has assigned allowances for responding to these comments. Should the effort required to complete the first draft responses to comments, PCR will not bill the remaining amount; conversely, should the number or complexity of comments received on the Draft EIR exceed our assumptions, PCR will notify the City immediately to request additional funds. PCR anticipates that the City will review the Screencheck Final EIR twice before approving its contents. Once the City approves the Final EIR, PCR will assist the City with distribution of the Final EIR to the appropriate agencies and organizations, including those agencies that commented on the Draft EIR and to local libraries. PCR will also prepare a Notice of Completion to be sent along with copies of the Final EIR to the State Clearinghouse and County Clerk, as well as the Findings of Fact and Statement of Overriding Considerations (if necessary) as part of this scope of work. As with the Draft EIR, PCR will prepare electronic files for posting of the document to the City website and will prepare CDs of the Draft EIR for distribution by the City. PCR will also prepare and distribute a Notification of Final EIR Review Locations to a list agreed to by the City. This notice will state the libraries where the Final EIR is available for review and the address for review of the Final EIR on the City website. Ten days after the Final EIR is sent to commenting agencies, public hearings regarding the project can commence. Page 21 of 24 Upon project approval, PCR will file the Notice of Determination with the County Clerk. This notice will start a 30 -day statute of limitations with regard to approval of the project and certification of the Final EIR. In order to facilitate filing of the NOD, PCR has included CDFW CEQA document filing fees ($3,070 for EIRs as of January 1, 2015) and San Bernardino County Clerk filing fees ($75 per filing) in our Direct Costs budget. Deliverables: ■ Five (5) copies of the Final EIR ■ One (1) digital copy in PDF format Task 7: Compile Project Record Following certification of the EIR for the project, PCR will compile the official project record, including the certified EIR and associated Resolutions of Approval. PCR will provide the City a paper and digital copy of this record upon completion of the project. Task 8: Management, Meetings/Teleconferences & Hearings The precise number of meetings required to complete the environmental review process for the project cannot be determined at this time. PCR has assumed that one monthly meeting or conference call, on average, will occur over the course of the EIR process, for a total of approximately ten (10) regular meetings or conference calls. In addition, throughout the course of the project, coordination with the City either by phone or in person will be required for technical input to the EIR and to address questions or comments regarding the EIR, particularly during preparation of the Draft EIR. As discussed above, PCR assumes that two (2) scoping meetings will be held for the project during the NOP comment period. PCR will provide presentation materials, attend, and make presentations at the scoping meetings as indicated in the City's RFP, and prepare a record of the comments received during the early consultation/scoping meeting process, as well as other comments relative to the EIR received during the process. In addition, PCR will attend up to four (4) public hearings for the project following preparation of the Final EIR. PCR will ensure that appropriate team members are available to attend, make presentations, and answer questions as required at the hearings. [7141119LWDIILt4 Upon authorization to proceed and receipt of the requisite data needs, the Project Description can be completed in approximately three (3) weeks. PCR assumes that review of the Project Description by the City will be completed within two (2) weeks. Following receipt of City comments on these materials, PCR will complete the Initial Study and Explanation of Checklist Determinations for City review within four (4) weeks. Although review times for the City are variable, two (2) weeks of City review time is assumed. Following the CEQA-required public review period (30 days) of the Initial Study, it is anticipated that the 1st Draft EIR would be provided to the team within 12 weeks (approximately three months). Following two round(s) of City review of the Draft EIR within an approximate time frame of four (4) weeks and two (2) weeks, respectively, PCR will incorporate all City comments and finalize and distribute the Draft EIR for public review. Following the minimum 45 -day public review period, we estimate that an approximate six- (6) week timeframe will be needed to complete the Final EIR based on the assumption that a moderate level of public comment regarding the Draft EIR will be received. Upon completion of the Final EIR, the Final EIR would be subject to approval by the City, which would occur at a time to be determined by the City. Overall, PCR anticipates that the EIR process up to completion of the Final EIR will require approximately twelve (12) months to complete. This schedule will be very dependent upon timely receipt of the information set forth in the data needs list, a stable project description, and timely review of the document by City staff. Page 22 of 24 The PCR project team will commit the necessary resources to ensure the preparation of the environmental review and related technical documents within the desired time frame. However, in the event that changes to the Project Description occur after it has been drafted, project information is not available or complete, changes in technical reports prepared by others, comments greatly exceed anticipated level, or if changes in the scope occur, the schedule would be affected. PCR will notify the City at the earliest point possible if issues arise with the potential to affect the project schedule. Task 11: Additional Effort on Draft EIR Sections Due to Project Changes The following summarizes the out -of -scope efforts to date and going forward to complete the Draft EIR: 1. Revisions to analysis narratives, technical reports, and figures throughout Draft EIR to address changes in the TTM and Project design details associated with the clubhouse relocation, with particularly involved revisions as relates to hydrology/water quality. 2. Updates and revisions to the cumulative analyses for all sections, as necessary, based on new related projects list from Iteris and updates in current conditions. Revised mobile -source impacts analysis for AQ, GHG, and noise per updated traffic data (see detailed description below). 4. Revise traffic section analysis based on updated Iteris TIS report addendum. S. Add discussion in Alternatives chapter to evaluate Secondary Emergency Access Options A and B. 6. Add references and analysis re: private park (to be confirmed by City). In addition to the technical updates, general/global updates, and other EIR section revisions noted above, ESA PCR will also need to update the mobile -source analyses for Air Quality, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Noise based on the updated traffic data provided by Iteris (see traffic task below). Specifically, ESA PCR will update the air quality and greenhouse gas (GHG) analyses to reflect the updated Project buildout year (either 2022 or 2023 to be determined by the City). ESA PCR will update the emissions estimates utilizing the updated versions of the emissions modeling programs (e.g., CaIEEMod 2016, EMFAC2014) and the updated Project schedule and buildout year, which would result in changes to the Project's mobile source emissions. ESA PCR will also update the regulatory setting to address recent developments to state law, particularly with respect to adoption of the statewide 2030 GHG reduction target. Given that the Project has a post -2020 buildout year, ESA PCR recommends addressing consistency with the recent developments regarding the statewide 2030 GHG reduction target as well as consistency with energy conservation strategies. ESA PCR will update the noise analysis to account for changes in future year traffic volume based on updated Project buildout year and the updated Project traffic study. ESA PCR will compare the update the traffic noise levels to the thresholds of significance and revise the impacts discussion as needed. ADDITIONAL TRAFFIC COUNTS AND UPDATED TRAFFIC IMPACT ANALYSIS (ITERIS) As requested by the City, Iteris has prepared a scope of work to perform additional traffic impact analysis in order to account for a later Project opening year than originally contemplated by the City and the applicant. Specifically, Iteris will prepare an addendum to the Hidden Oaks Country Club Traffic Impact Study (TIS) which includes a new project Opening Year of 2022 or 2023 (specific year to be determined by City staff). Opening Year without Project and with Project conditions will be evaluated at the same 13 intersections analyzed in the Traffic Impact Study. Opening Year traffic volumes will be derived from ambient traffic growth as well as cumulative development project traffic growth. Iteris will coordinate with City staff to obtain the latest cumulative development project list to include for the new Opening Year. Page 23 of 24 Intersections forecast to be significantly impacted by the proposed project will be identified. Feasible mitigation measures will be recommended to eliminate significant project impacts. The addendum will be submitted as a memorandum. It should be noted that no new traffic counts would be collected as part of this additional effort. Upon completion of the draft TIS Addendum, Iteris will respond to one set of comments from City staff and prepare a final TIS Addendum. ADDITIONAL MEETINGS AND MANAGEMENT/COORDINATION With regard to management/coordination and meetings, our original budget for these tasks assumed a total of $8,300 (48 hours) and $8,440 (56 hours), respectively, which was based on an assumed 12 -month schedule to complete the EIR process for the project. These values are allowances based on our best estimate of the level of effort required at that time. However, due to factors beyond ESA PCR's control, including significant delays due to redesign of the Tract Map to relocate the proposed clubhouse/recreation facility away from a ridgeline and related changes to applicant -prepared technical studies, the overall EIR schedule has been pushed out a minimum of 12 months (and likely up to 16 months to get to hearings) from that anticipated in our original scope of work. As with our original scope of work, the following amounts are also allowances, and thus would only be billed if necessary; similarly, if the full budget for this task is not ultimately necessary, ESA PCR will not bill the remaining balance. As such, ESA PCR requests additional funds to address these overages related to management coordination and meeting/hearing attendance. Page 24 of 24 EXHIBIT B COST Based on our understanding of the project and the Scope of Work provided earlier in this proposal, our anticipated labor costs to prepare an EIR and supporting technical studies for the proposed project are $314,650, not including optional tasks totaling $82,960 and direct costs of $10,890. In addition, at the request of the City, a contingency fee of $10,000 has been added to the cost estimate, for a total not -to - exceed amount of $418,500. No costs shall be charged to the contingency without prior written approval from the City specifying the additional work and associated cost to be charged to the contingency. The table on the following page provides a task -by -task breakdown of these costs. Fees and charges will be billed on a monthly basis in accordance with PCR's current Billing Rates and Expense Charges, provided after the table. Should the need arise for additional professional services beyond those set forth in the scope of services due to changes in the process or the regulatory environment, PCR will request written authorization from the City to proceed prior to the initiation of the additional services. Factors triggering an increase in the scope of services and a revised fee may include, but are not necessarily limited to: modifications in the project after the Project Description has been drafted; analysis of technical issues other than those identified in this scope of work; revisions due to changes in the technical reports prepared by others; more team or City comments or meetings than contemplated; more public comments than contemplated; production of additional documents; or significant delays in the project beyond the control of PCR. PCR cannot precisely indicate the level of effort and associated fees that will be required to incorporate team and City revisions to the various iterations of the Draft and Final EIR. In these instances, we have proposed allowances for these tasks. As indicated above, PCR expects a moderate level of comments on the Draft EIR and thus proposes an allowance of 100 staff hours (or $13,430) to complete the First Screencheck Final EIR for City review. In the event less effort is required than provided for with these allowances, PCR will not bill the balances. Similarly, if these allowances are not sufficient to complete the First Screencheck Final EIR or to incorporate City revisions to the Draft EIR or Final EIR, PCR will request additional authorization from the City. Amendment No. 2 ESA PCR has prepared this amendment request in order to address out -of -scope efforts in support of the Draft EIR for the Hidden Oaks Specific Plan Project in Chino Hills, California. Our existing Professional Services Agreement (PSA) dated May 12, 2015 is based on a scope of work prepared with input by City staff that included a number of assumptions, including those related to changes in the project, applicant technical studies, and overall project timeline. Specifically, our scope of work states that additional work related to changes in the Project design or other Project details, changes in applicant -prepared technical studies, or significant delays in the EIR process beyond the control of ESA PCR are considered out of scope requiring additional authorization from the City. Specifically, as stated on page 25 in Exhibit A of the PSA, "Factors triggering an increase in the scope of services and a revised fee may include, but are not necessarily limited to: modifications in the project after the Project Description has been drafted; [... I revisions due to changes in the technical reports prepared by others; [... ] or significant delays in the project beyond the control of PCR." The out of scope work summarized in this amendment is associated with changes to the project design, most notably revisions to the Tract Map to relocate a clubhouse/recreation building away from a ridgeline and associated changes to applicant -prepared technical studies, as well as additional meeting time and project management and coordination due to the significant delays caused by such changes. Page 1 of 13 Breakdown of additional costs associated with Task 11 Additional Effort on Draft EIR Sections Due to Project Changes Out -of -Scope Effort: Principal Planner - 32 hours @ $170/hour = $5,440 Senior Planner I - 48 hours @ $125/hour = $6,000 Senior Engineer/Scientist II - 28 hours @ $140/hour $3,920 Associate Engineer/Scientist - 36 hours @ $95/hour = $3,420 Graphics Specialist -12 hours @ $85/hour = $1,020 Publications/Production - 8 hours @ $50/hour = $400 COST: $20,200 Additional Traffic Counts And Updated Traffic Impact Analysis (ITERIS) COST: $4,660 Additional Meetings And Management/Coordination Out -of -Scope Effort: Director/Principal - 4 hours @ $205/hour = $820 Principal Planner - 36 hours @ $170/hour = $6,120 Senior Planner -16 hours @ $125/hour = $2,000 COST: $8,940 Page 2 of 13 Hidden Oaks Ranch Country Club EIR Cost Summary Task Task Description Fees Project Kick -Off Meeting $1,180 Review and Prepare Technical Reports Air Quality Analysis (PCR) $9,800 Biological Resources Assessment Update (PCR) $64,700 Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis (PCR) $5,600 Noise Analysis (PCR) $9,300 Traffic Impact Analysis (Iteris) $25,560 3 Prepare Initial Study and Notice of Preparation Prepare Draft Project Description $6,160 Revise/Finalize Project Description $3,080 Prepare and Distribute Initial Study/Notice of Preparation $9,820 4 Prepare Screencheck, Administrative EIR Prepare 15t Screencheck DEIR for City Review $100,210 Revise/Prepare 2nd Screencheck DEIR for City Review $11,800 5 Prepare Draft EIR Revise/Prepare Draft EIR for Public Review $7,440 6 Prepare Final EIR Prepare 1s'Screenheck Responses to Comments/Final EIR $13,430 Revise/Prepare 2nd Screencheck Responses to Comments/Final EIR $7,260 Prepare and Distribute Final EIR $4,700 Prepare Findings and Statement of Overriding Considerations $4,640 7 Prepare Project Record, Including Certified EIR $3,610 8 Management, Meetings/Teleconferences & Hearings Management Coordination $8,300 Meetings & Teleconferences $8,440 Public Scoping Meetings (2) $4,040 Public Hearings (4) $5,580 Subtotal Labor $314,650 Optional Task 9 Tree Inventory & Report (PCR & Mike Huff) $65,370 Optional Task 10 Visual Simulations (KTU+A) $17,590 Task 11 Additional effort due to project changes (Amendment No. 2) $33,800 Subtotal Direct Expenses $10,890 b Contingency Fee $10,000 d TOTAL COST (NOT TO EXCEED AMOUNT) $452,300 These values are allowances; actual costs could be higher or lower. Should actual costs be lower, only actual costs will be billed. Should circumstances cause actual cost to exceed budgets for the line items, additional authorization will be sought prior to exceeding approved budgets. For the purposes of this proposal, the scope of work assumes the following total staff hours would be required: 100 hours for the 15` Screencheck FEIR; 55 hours for the 2nd Screencheck FEIR; 40 hours to prepare and distribute the final FEIR; 28 hours to prepare the Findings and Statement of Overriding Considerations (if needed); 26 hours to prepare the Administrative Record; 48 hours for management/coordination; 56 hours for meetings and teleconferences; 28 hours for two (2) public scoping meetings; and 36 hours to attend four (4) public hearings. b This value is an estimate and will generally be determined by the number of copies of the Draft and Final EIR that will be required. For the purposes of this proposal, the scope of work assumes up to 30 hard copies and 100 CDs each for the Initial Study, Draft EIR, and Final EIR. C Direct costs include CDFW CEQA Document Filing Fees of $3,070 (as of January 1, 2015) and $75 San Bernardino County Clerk filing fee (paid three times, once each for NOP, NOC/NOA, and NOD). d No costs shall be charged to the contingency without prior written approval from the City specifying the additional work and associated cost to be charged to the contingency. Page 3 of 13 BILLING RATES & EXPENSE CHARGES Environmental Planning & Documentation PrincipalPlanner.................................................................................................................................................. $170.00 SeniorPlanner II................................................................................................................................................... $140.00 SeniorPlanner I....................................................................................................................................................$125.00 $125.00 Planner..................................................................................................................................................................... $110.00 AssociatePlanner....................................................................................................................................................$95.00 $110.00 AssistantPlanner....................................................................................................................................................$80.00 Technician..................................................................................................................................................................$65.00 Principal/Director............................................................................................................................................... Intern............................................................................................................................................................................ $55.00 Principal/Director............................................................................................................................................... $205.00 AssociatePrincipal.............................................................................................................................................. $180.00 Biological Services PrincipalRegulatory Scientist........................................................................................................................ $170.00 PrincipalBiologist................................................................................................................................................ $170.00 Senior Biologist II/Senior GIS Specialist....................................................................................................$140.00 $125.00 SeniorBiologist I..................................................................................................................................................$125.00 $110.00 Biologist................................................................................................................................................................... $110.00 AssociateBiologist..................................................................................................................................................$95.00 AssistantBiologist..................................................................................................................................................$80.00 Principal/Director............................................................................................................................................... Technician.................................................................................................................................................................. $65.00 Intern............................................................................................................................................................................ $55.00 AssociatePrincipal/Deputy Director........................................................................................................... $180.00 Principal, Biological and Environmental Compliance........................................................................... $205.00 Principal/Director............................................................................................................................................... $235.00 Air Quality, Climate & Acoustics Services Principal Engineer/Scientist...........................................................................................................................$170.00 $150.00 SeniorEngineer/Scientist II........................................................................................................................... $140.00 SeniorEngineer/Scientist I.............................................................................................................................. $125.00 Engineer/Scientist............................................................................................................................................... $110.00 Associate Engineer/Scientist.............................................................................................................................$95.00 AssistantEngineer/Scientist..............................................................................................................................$80.00 Technician..................................................................................................................................................................$65.00 Intern............................................................................................................................................................................$55.00 Principal/Director............................................................................................................................................... $185.00 Archeological & Paleontological Resources Principal Archaeologist/Paleontologist...................................................................................................... $150.00 Senior Archaeologist/Paleontologist II....................................................................................................... $140.00 Senior Archaeologist/Paleontologist I........................................................................................................ $125.00 Archaeologist/Paleontologist......................................................................................................................... $110.00 Associate Archaeologist/Paleontologist........................................................................................................$95.00 Assistant Archaeologist/Paleontologist........................................................................................................$80.00 Technician..................................................................................................................................................................$65.00 Intern............................................................................................................................................................................$55.00 Director.................................................................................................................................................................... $170.00 Support SeniorGIS Specialist.........................................................................................:................................................. $140.00 GraphicsSpecialist......................................:...........................................................................................................$85.00 SeniorPublications/Production.......................................................................................................................$75.00 Page 4 of 13 Publications/Production...................................................................................................................................... $50.00 Direct Expenses Direct expenses will be billed at 110 percent, including but not limited to: ■ Retention of subcontractors. ■ Purchase or rental of project materials and special supplies. ■ Reproduction, printing and photographic costs. ■ Postage, delivery, telephone and other communication costs when requested or approved by client. ■ Lodging, transportation, and project -related mileage necessarily incurred at the prevailing Internal Revenue Service Standard Mileage Rates. Billing Terms ■ Unless other contractual terms are agreed upon, PCR invoices on a monthly basis. Payment is due 30 days from date of invoice. ■ PCR's scheduling commitments are made and taken seriously. However, PCR reserves the right to modify performance schedules in instances where payment of PCR invoices falls behind agreed-upon terms. ■ PCR recalibrates its billing rates for professional time at the beginning of each calendar year and reserves the right to raise its billing rates for one or more professional categories by no more than five (5) percent 12 months following project initiation. ■ ESA PCR recalibrates its billing rate for professional time at the beginning of each calendar year and reserves the right to raise its billing rates for one or more professional categories by no more than five (5) percent 12 months following projection initiation. Page 5 of 13 QUALIFICATIONS The following section describes the proposed project team - PCR and its subconsultants Iteris (Traffic) and KTU+A (Visual Simulations) - including their role and abbreviated biographies, as well as descriptions of the team's relevant project experience. Key Personnel PCR has selected a team of individuals that best address the needs of the project. The proposed team, as described in the following section, is comprised of solid leadership supported by appropriate in-house experts assembled to address the needs of the Hidden Oaks Ranch Country Club Project. This core team will be ably supported by our robust team of in-house planners, scientists, engineers, specialists, graphic/technical illustrators, and support staff, as necessary to meet the needs of the project. PCR agrees not to substitute any proposed personnel without the approval of the City. Short biographies are provided below, one-page resumes are provided as an attachment. Jay Ziff, Principal/Director of Environmental Planning & Documentation I Principal -In -Charge Mr. Ziff is a PCR Principal and Director of the Environmental Planning & Documentation Division with over 20 years of experience as an environmental consultant and CEQA practitioner. In his role as Principal -In - Charge, he will support the PCR team through the provision of technical advice, project strategy, quality assurance/quality control, and contract administration, as needed. As a member of Executive Management, he is legally authorized to bind the firm, can negotiate on its behalf, and will help ensure that the resources of the firm are available to meet the needs of the project. Mr. Ziff's most relevant experience includes serving as the Project Manager for the Skyline Ranch residential development on a 2,173 -acre project site in unincorporated Los Angeles County. He also served as the Principal -In -Charge of the Cielo Vista Residential Development EIR; the Eastern Urban Center Sectional Planning Area EIR in Chula Vista, the North Main Street District Specific Plan Amendment EIR review and strategic advisory, and the Corona Regional Medical Center EIR. David Crook, AICP, Principal Planner I Project Manager Mr. Crook is a Principal Planner with 14 years of experience as an environmental consultant. As Project Manager, Mr. Crook will focus on the needs of the City and build and coordinate the efforts of the project team, maintaining on-going communication and supporting a coordinated effort until the work program is complete. He will be directly responsible for all aspects of the project's management, including day-to-day administration, regular interaction with designated City representatives, quality assurance/quality control, and making presentations at public meetings/hearings, as needed. Mr. Crook has managed and prepared numerous environmental documents of varying levels under CEQA during his career. In Chino Hills, Mr. Crook served as the lead analyst and task manager for the Chino Hills Shoppes, Civic Center, and Park EIR. Additional relevant projects include the Skyine Heights EIR in Corona, the Ontario Great Park Specific Plan EIR, the Cielo Vista Specific Plan Project EIR, the Westgate Specific Plan EIR in Fontana, the Golden Shore Master Plan EIR, and the Camp Emerald Bay Master Plan MND. He also served as the lead analyst for the University Villages Specific Plan EIR in Marina, and task manager for the Kohl Ranch Specific Plan EIR Addendum in unincorporated Riverside County. Mike Harden, Principal Planner I CEQA Support Mr. Harden has over 15 years of experience as an environmental planner. He will support Mr, Crook in the preparation of the required environmental documentation. He has prepared and managed all levels of CEQA documentation for a wide variety of project types. He will support Mr. Crook in the EIR preparation. Mr. Harden has prepared and managed all levels of CEQA documentation for a wide variety of project types. His experience includes managing the Cielo Vista Specific Plan Project EIR in unincorporated Orange County Page 6 of 13 regarding the development of up to 112 residential units and associated infrastructure on 48 acres of an 84 - acre site with potential annexation into the city of Yorba Linda. He also served as the project manager for the Otay Ranch Eastern Urban Center Sectional Planning Area, the Henning Way Subdivision MND in Anaheim, the City of Monrovia Hillside Wilderness Preserve and Recreation Area Resource Management Plan EIR, the Crestavilla Senior Housing project for the City of Laguna Niguel, and contributed to the Skyline Ranch EIR in the Santa Clarita Valley. Ceri Williams -Dodd, Ph.D., Senior Biologist II 1 Biological Task Manager Dr. Williams -Dodd is a biologist with over 12 years of professional experience with a solid biology background, a proven project manager, and skilled in communication and strategic planning. She will serve as the Biological Task Leader. Dr. Williams -Dodd leads and prepares the biological sections of varying levels of CEQA and NEPA compliance documents, Biological Resources Assessments, Biological Assessments for Section 7 consultations, habitat restoration plans, Biological Assessment/ Biological Evaluation (BA/BE) reports, MSHCP Compliance documents, and survey reports. She also conducts peer reviews and prepares response to comments for biological documents. She has an established relationship with the City of Chino Hills having managed the biological resources assessment and subsequent monitoring for the Hidden Oaks Ranch Country Club property since 2012. Additional Chino Hills experience includes a due diligence assessment of a Chino Hills dairy site where she assessed and documented potentially sensitive biological issues; the preparation of biological resources assessment and Habitat Mitigation and Monitoring Plan (HMMP), Section 7 consultation with USFWS for least Bell's vireo, CDFW Section 2080.1 consistency determination, and a jurisdictional determination letter for the Galstain Family Trust's proposed residential project; and the design, preparation and implementation of an HMMP along with agency coordination for a Harvest Land Company residential development that included approximately 8 acres of wetland, riparian, and upland habitats. Heidi Rous, CPP, Director of Air Quality, Climate & Acoustics Services I Air Quality & Climate Change Task Manager Ms. Rous has over 24 years of experience in compliance, air quality planning, emissions estimations and special studies. Ms. Rous will serve as the Air Quality and Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Task Leader. Ms. Rous has managed Air Quality Impact Assessments and Health Risk Assessments required under various State and federal environmental regulations including NEPA, CEQA, RMPP, Cal ARP, AB2588, AB32, and Proposition 65. Project experience includes GHG/global climate change analysis and peer review for the Monrovia's Hillside Wilderness Preserve and Recreation Area EIR for the City of Monrovia; the air quality and GHG studies for the Cielo Vista Specific Plan Project EIR; GHG impact assessment for the County of Riverside's Wine Country Community Plan which included an extensive trails network and development of the County's GHG Work Book to guide future development in accordance with the goals of AB32; the Point View Agriculture and Golf Master Plan on a Rancho Palos Verdes coastal bluff; and three large-scale remediation and development programs in Huntington Beach, Carson, and Warner Center regarding mass excavation and grading. Kyle Kim, Ph.D., Senior Acoustics Engineer I Noise Task Manager Dr. Kim has over 11 years of academic and professional experience. He will serve as the Task Manager for noise. He regularly performs construction and operational noise monitoring and roadway noise generation analysis for residential, infrastructure, industrial, and mixed-use projects subject to CEQA and NEPA compliance. Dr. Kim has used Ivie PC40, B&K 2236 and 2260; Larson -Davis 2800; and RION LN -27 to conduct noise analyses. Recent project experience includes noise studies for the North Main Street District Specific Plan EIR in Corona, the proposed Skyridge project regarding 86 family residential units in unincorporated Orange County, the Cielo Vista Specific Plan Project EIR near Yorba Linda, the Ontario Great Park EIR, and the Lytle Creek Development in unincorporated San Bernardino County. Page 7 of 13 Kyle Garcia, Senior Archaeologist I Cultural Resources Peer Review Mr. Garcia will review the cultural resources assessment being prepared under a separate contract. He will bring his 10 years of professional experience as a cross -trained archaeologist and paleontologist to the project. Over his career, he has contributed his expertise to more than 350 projects subject to requirements of CEQA, Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), NEPA, and other federal, State, and local regulations. Specific to peer review, Mr. Garcia has provided peer review services to the County of San Bernardino Department of Public Works, San Bernardino Associated Government, the City of Menifee, and the City of San Juan Capistrano on an as -needed basis. Janet Harvey, Senior Transportation Engineer I Traffic Task Manager Ms. Harvey has 27 years of public sector and professional consulting experience in multi -modal transportation planning and development. Her experience includes peer reviews, project management, strategic and annual policy planning, cost and schedule performance, design and construction oversight, and state/federal policy and law reviews. She has also been involved in City and County General Plan and Specific Plan updates, traffic impact analyses for numerous development projects, goods movement and trucking studies, port area planning, and parking studies. These include the update of the Orange County Long Range Freeway Needs Study, Downtown Long Beach Parking Study, Chino Circulation Element, a Trucking Study in North Los Angeles County, and the I-405/Dickens Street Interchange analysis. Relevant Project Experience The following projects depict PCR's experience as it pertains to the project at hand. Of particular importance is PCR's work on the proposed project through our Biological Services Division. That work is complemented by a number of Environmental Impact Reports regarding specific plans or subdivisions in previously undeveloped and/or mountainous terrain. Hidden Oaks Ranch Country Club Under contract to the City of Chino Hills, PCR performed field surveys on a 537 -acre site in the City of Chino Hills and prepared a Biological Resources Assessment (BRA) report. The proposed development is cited on steep vegetated terrain, much of which burned in a wildfire in 2007. In 2010 and 2012, PCR performed reconnaissance -level and focused surveys to determine the current conditions on-site following recovery from the 2007 fires, and to identify the presence or suitability for sensitive biological resources. Specifically, these surveys included a general biological survey, vegetation mapping, focused sensitive plant surveys, a focused coastal California gnatcatcher survey, a habitat assessment for least Bell's vireo and southwestern willow flycatcher, a habitat and burrow assessment for burrowing owls, and a jurisdictional investigation. PCR used the results of the surveys to prepare the BRA that was completed in October 2012, and notified the City of future additional survey needs including a focused burrowing owl survey and a tree inventory. The terrain of the site presented challenges during the field work that PCR was successfully able to overcome. PCR would apply these approaches to future surveys resulting in an increase in the project's time and cost efficiency. PCR would also be able to maximize the use of existing information thus providing the ability to update documents rather than preparing new ones, including the BRA and the majority of the survey reports. PCR is currently assisting with the identification and monitoring of sensitive biological resources during geotechnical work to avoid inadvertent impacts to these resources. Skyline Heights EIR PCR is preparing the EIR for the proposed development of 292 single-family residences on an approximately 271 -acre site within a larger 421 -acre project site in an undeveloped hillside area in the City of Corona sphere of influence in unincorporated Riverside County. The 271 -acre site is characterized by steep topography, not unlike the project at hand. Key issues include aesthetics/views, agriculture, air quality, Page 8 of 13 biology, cultural resources, greenhouse gas emissions, wildland fire hazards, noise, and traffic. The site is characterized by several natural drainages and various habitat types, and is bordered on the south by the Cleveland National Forest and a number of public trails with views of and across the project site. The project would require approval of a Tentative Tract Map for the residential development, annexation into the City of Corona, and a Conditional Use Permit for gated access to the residential portion of the project. Cielo Vista Residential Development PCR is preparing the EIR for the proposed Cielo Vista project in unincorporated Orange County, within the city of Yorba Linda's Sphere of Influence. The proposed project includes development of up to 112 residential units and associated infrastructure on 48 acres of an 84 -acre site, the remainder of which shall be preserved as permanent open space. The location, nature, and density of the project has created a high level of controversy from surrounding neighborhoods making flawless environmental analysis imperative for the client. Due to the project's location the EIR focused on key issues of land use and jurisdiction, wildland fires, biology, and aesthetics. PCR analyzed the applicable policies and regulations of both the County and City of Yorba Linda in the EIR realizing the potential for the site to be annexed into the city. The project's location also lends itself to wildland fire hazards, which requires implementation of a fire protection plan in compliance with Orange County Fire Authority standards. Relative to biology, the undeveloped nature of the site and the extant vegetation communities and animal species, including sensitive plant and animal species, required a detailed assessment of biological resources. PCR's biologists prepared a CEQA-level biological resources assessment report to summarize the findings of the biological field survey, jurisdictional delineation, sensitive plant species surveys, and focused surveys. Point View Project PCR prepared a Draft Environmental Impact Report (EIR) and began work on a Final EIR for the proposed Point View Project on a 94 -acre undeveloped, hillside coastal property located in the City of Rancho Palos Verdes. The EIR evaluated the following actions which constituted the proposed project: (1) a request for an exclusion from the City's landslide moratorium regulations (Moratorium Exclusion No. 10); and (2) a proposed future residential planned development with 84 single-family homes subject to approval of the moratorium exclusion. Approximately 60 acres of the 94 -acre property evaluated in the Draft EIR fell within the Landslide Moratorium Area and that was the subject of Moratorium Exclusion No. 10. In order to exclude the property from the Landslide Moratorium Area, up to 4 million cubic yards of remedial grading was proposed. The conceptual plan evaluated for a future residential project involved development of 84 single-family lots on land zoned at densities of one to two units per acre. In cooperation with the City and Palos Verdes Peninsula Land Conservancy, the development proposed to provide an approximately 40 -acre open space and wildlife corridor along the eastern and northeastern boundaries that would link Abalone Cove Shoreline Park with the proposed Upper Filiorum Open Space Reserve. Key issues addressed in the EIR focused on geology and landslide potential, hydrology, and biological resources. The analyses for geology and hydrology both related directly to landslide hazards and the proposed exclusion to the Landslide Moratorium Area. Although the site had been subject to extensive geotechnical investigations, and a detailed remedy was proposed to resolve landslide issues on the property, the issue was highly controversial and extensive comments were received on the Draft EIR, including issues raised by technical experts in the fields of geology and hydrology. Water quality concerns related to a 124 - acre ecological preserve/marine protected area, the Abalone Cove Ecological Reserve, which is located downstream from the site and is listed by the EPA as an impaired water body. Although the project would have set aside approximately 40 -acres as an open space and wildlife corridor for incorporation into a City approved Natural Communities Conservation Plan Reserve, biology issues were also of high interest as the area to be set aside and other areas of the site support coastal sage scrub/California gnatcatcher habitat, and Page 9 of 13 were proposed to be graded and then restored. Due to technical issues related to geology that were raised in comments on the Final EIR, the project was put on hold while additional borings were undertaken to better establish the location of the landslide area on the property. The project was ultimately withdrawn. Skyline Ranch EIR PCR prepared an EIR for the County of Los Angeles Department of Regional Planning for a planned residential development known as Skyline Ranch. The site occupies approximately 2,173 acres in unincorporated north Los County adjacent to the City of Santa Clarita. The project involves development on approximately 622 acres with 1,260 residential lots, an elementary school, public and private parks, and a system of trails, paseos, and bike paths. A major component of the project involves construction of Skyline Ranch Road as a Secondary Highway through the site, realigning Whites Canyon Road to connect to Sierra Highway in fulfillment of the County's proposed Highway Plan. Nearly three quarters of the site is proposed to remain undeveloped, with approximately 1,355 acres dedicated or designated to remain as natural open space. PCR coordinated extensively with the project team, the County, and other agencies throughout the process, including securing a permit with the Bureau of Land Management, helping with refinements to the project design, and defining the nature and extent of mitigation, including the characteristics of the conservation area. The project was of particular interest to the City of Santa Clarita given adjacency to the jurisdiction. The presence of the Cruzan Mesa Vernal pool complex and hundreds of acres of area proposed as a County Significant Ecological Area (SEA) in the northern portion of the site, was also a key area of interest for resource agencies and conservation groups. PCR also prepared a refined GHG analysis, quantifying the potential reduction from business as usual expected from mandatory and optional building standards and project design features. PCR analyzed the efficacy of numerous energy and resource reduction strategies. After extensive coordination, the Final EIR was certified by the County and the project was approved. Chula Vista Sectional Planning Area EIR PCR prepared the EIR for the Otay Ranch Eastern Urban Center (EUC) Sectional Planning Area (SPA) Plan in compliance with CEQA and the CEQA Guidelines for the City of Chula Vista. The proposed project comprises the EUC Sectional Planning Area (SPA) Plan and a Tentative Map (TM) that would allow the development of 2,983 multi -family residential units, 3.487 million square feet of commercial floor area, and sites for an elementary school, fire station, and neighborhood parks within an approximate 207 -acre section of the 238 - acre EUC. Otay Ranch is planned for a full range of land uses including residential, commercial, retail, and industrial park development, with supporting civic and community uses such as parks, libraries, and schools, as well as an approximately 11,375 acre open space preserve system. PCR prepared a refined GHG analysis, quantifying the potential reduction from business as usual expected from mandatory and optional building standards, project design features, and City -sponsored programs. PCR analyzed the efficacy of numerous energy and resource reduction strategies, including GHG emissions resulting from vehicle trip generation, electricity and natural gas usage, and the consumption of potable water. Lytle Creek Development PCR has been involved with the Lytle Creek Development composed of the 3,300 -acre Lytle Creek Ranch North Planned Development & Specific Plan in southwestern San Bernardino County since 1996. PCR has been responsible for performing a comprehensive assessment of biological resources on-site to address CEQA, NEPA, as well as the California and Federal Endangered Species Acts, including several annual focused surveys and detailed vegetation mapping and inventoried high priority natural communities of concern to resource agencies. In addition to biology, PCR identified and evaluated cultural and paleontological resources on the Ranch property and performed archaeological monitoring during earth moving activities on the North Planned Page 10 of 13 Development. PCR also prepared the air quality and global climate change technical reports to address the North Planned Development. SUBCONSULTANTS Iteris Iteris Inc. is a leader in providing intelligent information solutions to the traffic management market. The company is focused on the development and application of advanced technologies and software -based information systems that reduce traffic congestion, provide measurement, management and predictive traffic analytics, and improve the safety of surface transportation systems. By combining its decades of expertise in traffic management, and information technologies, Iteris offers a broad range of Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) solutions to customers worldwide. Janet Harvey, Senior Transportation Engineer I Traffic Task Manager Ms. Harvey has 27 years of public sector and professional consulting experience in multi -modal transportation planning and development. Her experience includes peer reviews, project management, strategic and annual policy planning, cost and schedule performance, design and construction oversight, and state/federal policy and law reviews. She has also been involved in City and County General Plan and Specific Plan updates, traffic impact analyses for numerous development projects, goods movement and trucking studies, port area planning, and parking studies. These include the update of the Orange County Long Range Freeway Needs Study, Downtown Long Beach Parking Study, Chino Circulation Element, a Trucking Study in North Los Angeles County, and the I-405/Dickens Street Interchange analysis. Chino General Plan Iteris assisted with the update of the City of Chino Circulation Element as part of the City's General Plan update. Chino is unique in that it has the College Park and The Preserve developments that allow the otherwise built out City to add new housing, schools and jobs. Transportation challenges included pressure on major arterials from regional growth as well as residential neighborhood cut -through traffic. As part of the work conducted, Iteris developed an updated travel demand model for the City, which in buildout conditions includes the addition of a new interchange of Pine Avenue at SR 71. Measure M limits new housing in existing built areas without a vote by the citizens, therefore two land use scenarios were evaluated, one with Measure M constraints and the other which assumes an approval of new housing by the local citizens. In addition to the model development, Iteris conducted intersection level of service analyses as well as traffic projections on key arterials. Shops at Santa Anita Park Specific Plan Traffic and Parking Analysis Iteris completed a comprehensive traffic study of the proposed Santa Anita Park Specific Plan project in the City of Arcadia. The study included over 40 key intersections plus adjacent freeway facilities. The project is located at the site of the existing Santa Anita Park Racetrack and would incorporate retail and residential uses with the current racetrack facilities. The project is proposed to include a wide mix of land uses including retail, grocery, fitness center, cinema, restaurant, housing and the racetrack special events. To estimate trip generation, detailed trip generation studies were done that started with standard trip rates from the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) and then applied special adjustments for internal trip capture, pass -by trip making and trip sharing due to the mix of land uses. The traffic study was done using "race -day" counts to ensure a conservative analysis that accounted for all on-site uses being active simultaneously. As part of the project, Iteris conducted detailed parking demand estimates, and also developed parking and circulation plans for the site to ensure that traffic will be managed between the multiple uses, including retail traffic on racing days. Parking and circulation plans were developed for each entrance gate area that display the driveways, ticketing area, vehicle queuing areas, traffic control, and Page 11 of 13 special features such as barriers that can be opened or closed for each parking area as needed based on demand. Mitigation measures and associated concept drawings were developed for 19 of the study intersections. Warner Center TOD Specific Plan Under contract to the Los Angeles Department of City Planning, Iteris conducted a restudy of the Warner Center Specific Plan. In this major effort, Iteris is part of a multi -disciplinary consultant team comprised of prominent urban planners and designers, economists, architects and environmental specialists. Located in western San Fernando Valley, encompassing approximately 1.65 square miles, Warner Center is one of the largest multi -use activity centers in the City of Los Angeles consisting of a variety of uses including office, retail research and development, industrial and residential land uses. Warner Center is currently home to over 16 million square feet of office, retail and light industrial uses, three major public transit hubs, and approximately 4,000 existing residential units and another 3,000 additional units under construction or entitled. The primary objective of the new Warner Center Specific Plan is to reestablish a compelling vision of Warner Center in 2035 — a vision that reinforces its role as a great destination in the Los Angeles region and transforms it to a Transit Oriented Development area to take advantage of four stations on the Metro Orange Line. To achieve this goal, the consultant team and City staff integrated urban design, land use planning and mobility in a collaborative process which was guided and shaped strongly by the Warner Center Citizen's Advisory Committee, property owners, developers, residents and other stakeholders. The consultant team also received direct input from the stakeholders through several community charrettes and public workshops. Multi -modal mobility improvement strategies were developed to address potential traffic impacts and deficiencies including traditional arterial and highway improvements as well as innovative measures such as bus rapid transit (BRT), alternative modes of transportation and Transit Oriented Development (TOD) strategies. City of Fontana Peer Review of Traffic Impact Analyses Iteris, as part of an on-call consultant team, provides peer reviews of traffic impact analysis studies for the City of Fontana. The studies cover various development projects, most of which are implemented over several years. Due to the proximity of the freeway, access to the freeway is a critical issue within the reports. The traffic studies are typically large scale, with approximately 7,500 to 10,000 daily vehicle trips. Iteris provides a review of study methodology, adherence to required study guidelines, completeness and accuracy of the analyses, and review of mitigation measures. A memorandum of results is prepared and reviewed with the City and the project applicant. KTU+A KTU+A is a collaboration of planners, landscape architects, GIS analysts, irrigation designers and graphic designers focused on the creation of healthy communities. Established in 1970, KTU+A has expanded the boundaries of a traditional landscape architecture office by incorporating active transportation, community planning, federal planning, and natural resource management practices into our portfolio. With this diversity, KTU+A has the ability to help shape the bigger picture while addressing the fine-grained details that contribute to sustainable natural and built environments. Mike Singleton, AICP CTP, ASLA, LEED AP, Principal I Visual Simulations Mr. Singleton is the principal of KTU+A's Planning team. He has authored numerous visual impact assessments and design guidelines for public buildings, private developments and infrastructure projects and specializes in the planning and design of integrated multi -use transit facilities and recreation facilities. Mr. Singleton's relevant project experience includes the visual impact assessment to evaluate the potential visual and aesthetic impacts of the proposed Chula Vista Bayfront Master Plan whose components included residential, hotel, retail, civic and office buildings, as well as the reconfiguration of public and private open Page 12 of 13 space. He has also led the visual impact assessment efforts to address the proposed Welk Resort Village and Solana Beach infill projects, using visual simulations and mitigation measures to ensure the integration of the project into the existing context was seamless as possible. Project Experience With more than forty years of experience working with communities, KTU+A has the experience and expertise to create aesthetically enduring and sustainable projects. Successfully balancing social, economic, and environmental interests is at the heart of KTU+A's process for providing unique solutions for our communities. After carefully considering the site's natural features, open space, architecture, and urban design, we deliver solutions that provide connection, civic identity, and community pride. KTU+A's experience in the fields of planning and design provides the technical background for the preparation of visual impact assessments and computer-generated visual simulations. Guidelines established by the State of California, Federal Highway Administration, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Forest Service and individual governing agencies, such as counties and cities, are utilized to develop a visual assessment process that is defensible as part of the EIR/EIS process and in conformance with CEQA and NEPA requirements. Main Street Bridge Visual Impact Assessment, Temecula Interstate 15/French Valley Parkway Interchange Visual Impact Assessment, Temecula Welk Resort Village Center Visual Impact Assessment, Escondido Miramar Hotel Visual Impact Assessment, Santa Monica Sunset Boulevard Office Building Visual Impact Assessment, West Hollywood Museum of Tolerance Expansion Visual Impact Assessment, Los Angeles Entrada Office Building Visual Simulation Expert Witness, Culver City Collier Park Renovations, La Mesa Veteran Pier Visual Study, San Diego San Diego Convention Center Expansion and Convention Center Hotel, San Diego Beacon's Beach Visual Impact Assessment, Encinitas Chula Vista Bayfront Master Plan Visual Impact Assessment EIR Technical Study, Chula Vista Willow Street Bridge Replace Project Visual Impact Assessment, Chula Vista UCSD Utility Bridge Visual Impact Assessment, San Diego Mid -Coast LRT Transit Alternative Studies and Environmental Review, San Diego El Monte Valley Mining, Reclamation, and Groundwater Recharge Project, Lakeside Agua Hedionda Pump Station Visual Study & Site Design, Carlsbad San Diego County Water Authority Emergency Water Storage Project Visual Impact Assessment, San Diego County Miramar Landfill General Development Plan EIR Visual Impact Assessment Page 13 of 13