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Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan A2017-076A2017-076 Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan Certification and Agreement The Community Wildfire Protection Plan developed by and for Carbon Canyon: • Was collaboratively developed. Interested parties and federal land management agencies managing land in the vicinity of Carbon Canyon have been consulted. • This Plan identifies and prioritizes areas for hazardous fuel reduction treatments and recommends the types and methods of treatment that will protect Carbon Canyon. • This Plan recommends measures to reduce the ignitability of structures throughout the area addressed by the Plan. • This Plan is not intended to limit each Fire Agency's ability to manage its resources and does not constitute a financial obligation. The following entities attest that the standards listed above have been met and mutually agree with the contents of this Community Wildfire Protection Plan: ZMI=� Lt -25-17 Glenn Barley, Unit C ief Date Cal Fire - Mono, Inyo, San Bernardino Unit KaylTarquez, m City of Chino Hill Attest: Sarah f Amos-Evinger, Board Pr i nt Date Chino Valley Independent Fire District -S l`J Date Cecilia Hupp, Mayor Date �� /', City of Brea C l Walz , - dlalrk Date Tim Shackelford, Chief Date Chino Valley Independent Fire District 3/-� , Eric 1 hn on Date Carbo C nyon Fire Safe Council CWPP Committee 3 9 t Z" Wolfgang Knabe, Chief Date Fullerton/Brea Fire Department George Ullrich Date Carbon Canyon Fire Safe Council CWPP Comm. CARBON CANYON COMMUNITY WILDFIRE PROTECTION PLAN MARCH 22017 FireSafe �, coin THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK Table of Contents SECTION I - INTRODUCTION AND COMMUNITY OVERVIEW...........................................1 Introduction..........................................................................................................................1 CommunityLocation...........................................................................................................1 Demographics......................................................................................................................2 Project Area Plant Communities and Habitat......................................................................2 Current Condition of Project Area Habitat..........................................................................4 ProjectArea Topography.....................................................................................................5 ProjectArea Weather...........................................................................................................6 ProjectAre Fire History.......................................................................................................6 SECTION II - IDENTIFICATION OF COMMUNITY VALUES AT RISK................................8 Local Preparedness and Firefighting Capability..................................................................8 Assessing the Hazards and Values.......................................................................................8 DeterminingHazard Ratings................................................................................................9 SECTION III - PRIORITIES AND RECOMMENDATIONS TO REDUCE STRUCTURAL AND WILDLAND IGNITABILITY................................................................................10 CarbonCanyon Road.........................................................................................................10 Manufactured Home Parks................................................................................................10 Fire Plans for all Institutional/Industrial Entities in the Canyon.......................................10 VegetationManagement....................................................................................................10 Creating Fire Safe Neighborhoods.....................................................................................1 I AccurateWeather Information.......................................................................................... I I FireWatch Programs.........................................................................................................11 Disaster Communication Programs...................................................................................12 Gold Spotted Oak Borer/Shot Hole Borer.........................................................................12 Firestone Boy Scout Reservation.......................................................................................12 EvacuationPlans................................................................................................................12 SECTION IV - ACTION PLAN AND ASSESSMENT STRATEGY.........................................13 CarbonCanyon Road.........................................................................................................13 Manufactured Home Parks................................................................................................14 Fire Plans for all Institutional/Industrial Entities in the Canyon.......................................15 VegetationManagement....................................................................................................16 Creating Fire Safe Neighborhoods.....................................................................................19 AccurateWeather Information..........................................................................................22 FireWatch Programs.........................................................................................................23 Disaster Communication Programs...................................................................................24 Table of Contents (cont.) Gold Spotted Oak Borer & Shot Hole Borer.....................................................................26 Firestone Boy Scout Reservation.......................................................................................28 Carbon Canyon Evacuation Plans......................................................................................29 APPENDIX A — LIST OF STAKEHOLDERS APPENDIX B-1 — COMMUNITIES AND WILDLAND URBAN INTERFACE AREA MAP APPENDIX B-2 — FUEL RANK & POTENTIAL FIRE BEHAVIOR MAP APPENDIX C-1 — PROJECT AREA FIRE HISTORY MAP APPENDIX C-2 — PROJECT AREA FIRE ORIGIN HISTORY MAP APPENDIX D — COMMUNITY RISK ASSESSMENT APPENDIX E — STAKEHOLDER SURVEY RESULTS THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan SECTION I — INTRODUCTION AND COMMUNITY OVERVIEW Introduction In November 2003 the Healthy Forest Restoration Act (HFRA) was signed into Federal Law. It emphasizes the need for federal agencies to work collaboratively with communities in developing fuel reduction projects and it places priority on values identified by the communities themselves through a Community Wildfire Protection Plan (CWPP). Federal and State agencies are committed to the development and implementation of CWPP's. Grant monies are given priority assignment to communities with an approved plan. This CWPP is an update of a Plan developed in 2011, which was an expansion of a Plan written in 2002. CWPP Development Partners Debbie Chapman Cal Fire Ryan Dacko Chino Valley Independent Fire District Kathy Schaefer Brea Fire Department Ken Kietzer California Department of Parks and Recreation Stakeholders The stakeholders are listed in Appendix A. Community Location Carbon Canyon straddles the San Bernardino, Orange and Los Angeles County lines with the cities of Chino Hills in the east, Yorba Linda to the south, Brea in the west and unincorporated Los Angeles County to the north. The exact location is: LATITUDE: 33.934 N LONGITUDE: -117.737 W 1 Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan Although Carbon Canyon is several miles from federal land, it is impacted by fires originating in the Cleveland National Forest. Chino Hills State Park and Carbon Canyon Regional Park form most of the plan area's southern boundary. At risk communities benefitting from this project include: Brea, Chino, Chino Hills, Corona, Diamond Bar, La Habra, La Habra Heights, Placentia, and Yorba Linda. Political districts in this Plan include; Congressional District — 39th State Assembly District — 55th State Senate District — 29th Plan Area Boundaries See the Wildland Urban Interface Map in Appendix B. Demographics Within the project area, there are approximately 3,125 household units with an average value of $864,000. Estimated housing value is in excess of $2.7 trillion. Over 80% are owner occupied. There are 3.4 people in the average household. Carbon Canyon is an affluent community with an average household income of $117,056 and a median household income of $106,169. Reflecting recent development, the median age is 39. Project Area Plant Communities and Habitat The Project Area in and surrounding Carbon Canyon is located in the Chino hills in the cities of Brea and Chino Hills. It is part of a much larger, natural area that extends southeast to the Cleveland National Forest in the Santa Ana Mountains. The Cleveland National Forest contains over 460,000 acres of natural open space and habitat, stretching from Riverside and Orange Counties to San Diego County. Diversity is perhaps the most important feature of the vegetation found within the Chino Hills. Within creek and riparian areas, cattail stands provide habitat for a variety of wildlife. Along seasonal and year-round creeks, the willow and sycamore woodlands have understories of wild rose, stinging nettle, and mule fat. California black walnut trees, sycamores, and coast live oaks form woodlands above the creeks, on many north facing slopes. The following paragraphs, most of which are from the City of Brea General Plan, describe major plant communities within the project area. Each plant community contains unique features and supports a variety of wildlife species. Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan Chaparral Habitat Chaparral consists of evergreen, medium -height to tall shrubs which commonly cover hills and slopes of Southern California. This community is highly adapted to drought and fire conditions. Shrub canopy cover is generally continuous. California sagebrush and California buckwheat occur within the understory of larger shrubs. The chaparral community is ecologically fitted to a cycle of fire destruction. Periodic (every 40-50 years) fires help recycle and rejuvenate many chaparral plant species and reduce the danger of a more catastrophic fire. Chaparral shows a distinct tendency to be deeper and heavier on the southeast side of Carbon Canyon and more open on the northwest side of the canyon. Sage Scrub Habitat Sage scrub can be defined as low -drought -deciduous and evergreen shrubs that occur on steep to moderate slopes. It is considered a sensitive habitat due to its potential to support threatened and endangered species. Common animal species include deer, rabbit, bobcat, and coyote, as they utilize the scrub habitat as part of a larger home range. Several different scrub and chaparral communities along the hills and slopes above the canyon floors include coastal sage scrub, California sagebrush, California buckwheat, and purple sage, as well as a mixed chaparral community dominated by laurel sumac and toyon. Many California wildlife species depend on these scrub and chaparral communities for survival. Grassland Habitat Grasslands consist of low herbaceous vegetation dominated by grasses. They thrive in deep, well developed soils on gentle slopes and flats. Most of the grassland in the Chino Hills is non-native annual European grasses that were introduced here during the early ranching years. However, grassland species native to California, such as purple needle grass and giant rye can be found among the annuals. The grasslands are green during the rainy season and spring, but with the advent of summer dry into a golden mantle. Grasslands provide forage for cattle and other grazing animals, and habitat for small reptiles, rodents, deer, coyotes, songbirds, and birds of prey. Grasslands, with some widely scattered brush or trees contained within, occupy large swaths of the northwestern portion of Carbon Canyon, as well as the tops of many of the broad ridges. Riparian Habitat A riparian community is a combination of plant species that thrive along intermittent and perennial waterways. These waterways can be found at the bottom of the many canyons found in the hillsides, including Carbon, Tonner, Sonome, Soquel, and Telegraph Canyons. Creeks and streams and the associated riparian vegetation provide wildlife habitat, stormwater drainage, visual backdrops, and recreation corridors. Riparian habitats are considered among the most valuable habitats for wildlife because of the presence of water, lush vegetation, and high insect populations. Riparian habitat provides cover and food for numerous animals and nesting birds. Many nesting birds are migratory species that come to the streamside habitats from Central and South America each spring to raise their young. In addition, Arundo donax has been a long-standing problem in Carbon Creek. Arundo donax is a thick - stemmed plant in the grass family, resembling bamboo, which grows up to 30 feet tall. It forms many- Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan stemmed clumps, spreading from thick knotty roots that grow horizontally, not downward. The root masses can spread over several acres, quickly forming large colonies that displace other plants. Arundo donax is a plant that quickly absorbs the water that is in the surrounding area, stealing from the native vegetation. It has many detrimental effects on wetlands, streams, and the community. This invasive plant out -competes native vegetation and takes advantage of impacts from development, floods, and fires. Arundo donax increases erosion during stream events because roots break off during flood events and allow large portions of the riverbank to drop into the river. The roots take hold in eroded banks downstream and the plant grows immediately from the root before native plants can become reestablished. Arundo donax provides little value for native and migratory animal species, as it does not branch and contains silica (glass), and decreases water quality. Arundo donax also easily catches fire and increases the intensity of fires, as well as producing large volumes of firebrands, which when windblown, contribute to fire spread. The intense fires kill native plants, destroy wetland habitats, and create enormous safety hazards. Since the Freeway Complex Fire in 2008, there has been a multi -agency multi-year effort to eradicate the Arundo donax in Carbon Canyon. Once the plant is completely removed from the canyon it will take a vigilant effort by numerous cooperating agencies to insure that it does not reestablish itself in the canyon. While chaparral habitat requires natural fires to propagate certain important native species, this natural cycle is 40 to 150 years. Woodland Habitat Woodland is a plant community with a diverse mix of tree species forming a dense overstory of vegetation. Woodlands are primarily located on the north and east facing slopes of the canyons. Common trees in the woodland community include coastal live oak, California walnut, and Mexican elderberry. The walnut woodlands are an important and rare plant community preserved in the hillside areas. Only a few thousand acres of this California walnut habitat still exist, with about one thousand acres in preserves, most of which are located in Chino Hills State Park. Insect- or seed -eating birds and mammals are common in the woodlands and are preyed upon by raptors and owls that also inhabit these areas. The larger mammals utilize these areas as well, including deer, coyotes, and foxes. The "woodland" designation also includes residential yards and roadsides. Woodland occupies the canyon floor, lowermost slopes, and strips along the minor streams, especially on steep north or east facing aspects. Current Condition of Project Area Habitat Due to the increased occurrence of human caused wildfires over the last 30 years, the entire Project Area habitat is under a great deal of stress. While chaparral habitat requires natural fires to propagate certain important native species, the natural cycle is 40 to 50 years. The recent pattern in many parts of the Chino hills is now 3 to 5 years. This means that these native plants are burning so frequently that their root crowns are depleted and they are not able to reach maturity to the point of propagation. Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan The increased wildfire cycle is also allowing many more non-native weeds and grasses to encroach on more fire- resistant habitat. The native plants, such as toyon and laurel sumac, grow slowly after the fire. In the intervening time, fast-growing non -natives, such as black mustard, ripgut, and wild oats, crowd out the available space once occupied by the native habitat. These events have led to the increased number of acres in the Project Area that include flashy fuels that dry quicker in the spring and ignite easier, creating greater risks to adjacent homes. Project Area Topography The project area consists of steep slopes, canyons, and rolling hills, which are resulted from uplift and folding along the Whittier -Elsinore and Chino faults. The elevation in the project area varies from about 500 feet to 1,400 feet above sea level. The majority of the Carbon Canyon area contains slopes from 10 to 40 percent or greater in some areas. The project area is underlain primarily by two geologic units: relatively weak semi -consolidated sedimentary bedrock in the hilly and mountainous areas, and loose, unconsolidated, often saturated, alluvial sediments in the valley and canyon bottoms. These soil types have the potential for liquefaction and collapse. The fine-grained components of some of the bedrock units are moderately to highly expansive. Mapping by the California Geological Survey (1995) reclassified the hillside areas as marginally susceptible to mudflows. This is exacerbated by the frequent fires that denude the hillsides. Areas with more topographic relief, like Carbon Canyon, can be subject to erosion and the loss of topsoil. The "lay of the land," whether flat ground, rolling hills, or steep rugged canyons can have a significant effect on the way a wildland fire is fought. The safety of firefighters, the extent of property damage, and the deployment of resources are all affected by topography. Normally, fires spread many times faster uphill than on flat ground. A fire burning upslope will preheat the fuels above, allowing them to easily ignite. The steeper the slope, the faster fire will spread. Also, the direction a slope faces (aspect) influences fuel conditions because those on south and west facing slopes will have smaller and drier fuels. Canyons act as chimneys, trapping heat, intensifying the combustion of fuels, and potentially causing large areas to ignite throughout the canyon. Canyons, saddles, and ridgelines deflect and intensify winds, thus changing the direction and speed with which the fire burns. All of these topographical conditions exist within the Carbon Canyon area. Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan Project Area Weather The project area benefits from a mild, temperate climate, with average monthly temperatures ranging from the low 40's to the upper 80's. Monthly rainfall averages from a high of 4.1 inches to no rain at all for most months of the year. At times, temperatures will rise to the low 100's, and humidity will drop considerably, resulting in ideal fire conditions. Additionally, Carbon Canyon is subject to Santa Ana winds of 25 to 40 miles per hour, with gusts up to 60 to 75 miles per hour. These winds come out of the desert, blow to the southwest, and are often accompanied by hot temperatures and relative humidity of 10% to 20%. The weather conditions in Carbon Canyon have contributed to major fires in the past. Hot dry weather causes fuels to dry out. Small fuels, such as grasses, respond to weather changes rapidly. After two or three days of hot dry weather, small fuels will readily burn and help ignite some of the larger fuels. Heavier fuels take longer to dry out and it can be weeks or even months before they are ready to burn. When the heavy fuels dry out explosive fire conditions can occur. Fire will burn violently with extreme flame heights and windborne firebrands occurring well ahead of the fire front. Wind will affect a fire's direction and rate of speed. Wind driven fires can easily exceed the ability of fire suppression forces to bring the fire under control. Burning firebrands can be carried over a mile in front of a fire under these conditions. These types of weather patterns exist in Carbon Canyon and are a serious threat to residents, especially since there is only one road in and out of the canyon. The prevailing on -shore winds move eastward through the canyon. Off -shore winds, or Santa Ana winds, move south and west through Carbon Canyon and the side canyons, often at high speeds. But during an extreme wind event, as occurred during the Freeway Complex Fire in 2008, the winds are constantly shifting. This obviously makes it very difficult for anyone to predict the path of a fire. Project Area Fire History Over the last 50 years, the hills within the Project Area have seen eighteen fires which have burned a collective 89,209 acres. They are detailed below and shown on the Fire History and Origin Maps in Appendix C. Shell Fire La Vida Fire Firestone Fire Soquel Fire Ranch Fire Carbon Fire Owl Fire Shell Fire Yorba Fire Carbon Canyon Fire Carbon Cyn (Wagon) Carbon Canyon Fire Blue Gum Fire Carbon Canyon Fire Yorba Linda Fire Rose Fire July 2, 1947 November 29, 1959 October 30, 1967 October 23, 1978 June 19, 1979 November 16, 1980 October 28, 1980 August 11, 1985 July 12, 1990 June 27, 1990 June 25, 1994 August 31, 1998 November 20, 2002 September 25, 2004 July 5, 2005 April 12, 2007 118 acres 610 acres 236 acres 5,428 acres 61 acres 14,612 acres 18,332 acres 1,634 acres 7,884 acres 6,664 acres 757 acres 733 acres 496 acres 17 acres 1,078 acres 8 acres Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan Freeway Complex Fire November 15, 2008 30,035 acres Carbon Canyon Fire July 11, 2011 518 acres The above mentioned vegetation, topography, weather patterns, and proximity to people have combined numerous times over the last 50 years to form a significant threat to the people, buildings, wildlife and plant life of Carbon Canyon. The threat is real and all too common. So while people and houses start fires, vegetation and wind carry the fires. Since we can't control the wind, we have to look at the other items: people, houses, and the vegetation around people and houses. It will be with this in mind that we determine the fire risks and the things that can be done to lessen those risks. Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan SECTION II — IDENTIFICATION OF COMMUNITY VALUES AT RISK Local Preparedness and Firefighting Capability The primary firefighting capabilities in Carbon Canyon are provided by Chino Valley Independent Fire District on the Chino Hills side of the canyon and Brea -Fullerton Fire Department on the Brea side of the canyon. Chino Valley Fire has one station in the Chino Hills side of the canyon which houses an engine company. The station is staffed with three personnel. Brea Fire has one station in the Brea side of the canyon which houses a brush engine and is staffed with three personnel. Other fire agencies that provide secondary firefighting capabilities include San Bernardino County Fire Department, Orange County Fire Authority, Los Angeles County Fire Department, and Cal Fire. Carbon Canyon is also home to the Carbon Canyon Fire Safe Council, established in 2002. Assessing the Hazards and Values ""Fmwm�w To determine Hazard Ratings for the Carbon Canyon Assets -at -Risk, a matrix was developed. Various segments of the community were identified, and categorized by Structure, Infrastructure, Recreational & Scenic, Watershed, and Others. Then each was assessed based on Fire Risk, Protection Capabilities, and Values. The characteristics of each category are detailed below. Fire Ri-k • Fire Frequency — The higher occurrence, the higher the rating • Fuel Risk — The more existing fuels, the higher the rating • Slopes Risk — The steeper the slopes, the higher the rating • Building Construction/Density Risk — The older the building and the denser the structures the higher the rating Protection Capabilities • Lack of Response Resources — The fewer response resources, the higher the rating • Lack of Response Access — The less response accessibility, the higher the rating • Lack of Response Time — The higher the response time, the higher the rating • Lack of Prevention Programs — The fewer prevention programs, the higher the rating • Lack of Escape Routes — The fewer available escape routes, the higher the rating Values Impact to Ecosystem — The higher the impact to the surrounding ecosystem of a fire starting on each part of the community, the higher the rating Impact to Recreation and Scenic - The higher the impact to the surrounding recreation and scenic values of a fire starting, the higher the rating Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan Impact to Community Infrastructure - The higher the impact to the community infrastructure of a fire starting on each part of the community, the higher the rating Impact to Economics - The costlier the economic impact of a fire starting on each part of the community, the higher the rating Determining Hazard Ratings To be able to assign a rating to each of the Assets -at -Risk, a sliding scale of 1 to 10 was assigned to each hazard and value. In addition, each category within a hazard or value was weighted on a scale of 1 to 10 to determine a level of fire hazard importance within a hazard or value. The results are detailed in Appendix D. Stakeholder Survey To receive feedback from residents and stakeholders in Carbon Canyon, we conducted an on-line survey. The survey asked a range of questions from general feelings about levels of safety to what they value and think is important individually. Interestingly, while more than three quarters of respondents felt that the overall safety level in the canyon was worrisome or dangerous, more than three quarters also felt that they personally were prepared. This suggests people are aware of the danger and cognizant of the need to be prepared. Concurrently, half of the respondents feel we have adequate resources in case of a fire but also half think resources are inadequate. Survey responses statistically tell us how residents feel about their own personal safety and about the safety of Carbon Canyon. More specific questions and answers are detailed in the next section. Survey results are detailed in Appendix E. Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan SECTION III — PRIORITIES AND RECOMMENDATIONS TO REDUCE STRUCTURAL AND WILDLAND IGNITABILITY Carbon Canyon Road. Carbon Canyon Road, maintained by two separate Caltrans districts, is a major contributor to wildfires in the canyon. Although it is only a two-lane state highway, it handles roughly 20,000 vehicle trips per day. Heavy traffic volume through a high fire zone leads to accidental fires from thoughtless fire to arson. While Caltrans can't stop arsonists, it can make it more likely that other fires never get started. Proper maintenance and clearing of the roadside for 10 feet on each side of the road is needed on a timely basis. Also, if a fire were to occur during those times when traffic is completely stopped, it could result in the loss of human life. As part of the survey, a quarter of respondents specified traffic as the most important fire safety issue in the canyon. Manufactured Home Parks. There are two manufactured or mobile home parks in Carbon Canyon. Special precautions are required due to their unique construction and density. Management and residents need to be kept well-informed of Fire -wise principles and the Mobile -home Park Wildfire Safety and Emergency Preparedness requirements of the California Health and Safety Code (section 18603). The Carbon Canyon Fire Safe Council and each local fire agency works with park management to insure all fire regulations and standards are being followed, as well as developing evacuation plans. Fire Plans for all Institutional/Industrial Entities in the Canyon. There are numerous institutional and industrial entities located in Carbon Canyon, including various utilities, a landfill, oil drilling facilities, and two religious institutions. Since fires from these facilities can have a large impact on the Canyon, each of these entities should have a detailed prevention and fire -fighting plan. As an example, poorly maintained oilfield power lines were a source of ignition for the Freeway Complex Fire. Vegetation Management. Due to the varied nature of vegetation in Carbon Canyon and the close proximity of structures, there are numerous things that can be done to reduce vegetation fire risk. They are: • Thinning of dead growth and ladder fuels within 100 feet of structures • Removal of non-native vegetation and dead growth in Carbon Creek • Removal of brush in flood control channels • Identify existing sensitive -species habitat • Develop a post -fire, native habitat restoration plan • Provide community education and enforcement creating defensible space around structures • Educate the community about fire safe landscaping • Assist residents with cut vegetation disposal service. Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan From the Survey, more than a third of respondents believe creating defensible space and non-native vegetation removal are the most important fire safety issue in the canyon. In addition, almost all survey respondents believe removing non-native vegetation is important. Creating Fire Safe Neighborhoods. Since any house fire has the potential to spread to other houses and the nearby wild lands, reducing house fires should be a goal of any CWPP. Educating residents and also insuring that the house itself is fire safe is the goal. Measures to insure that residents are being fire- safe include: • Home Fire Safety Training • Providing information on fire resistive building products and ways to retrofit existing homes • Educating on the safe use of power tools near brush • Offering fire preparation training and evacuation planning, such as Ready Set Go programs • Encouraging residents to take Community Emergency Response Training (CERT) • Encouraging enrollment in County Reverse 911 communicatons. Measures to insure fire safe structures include: • Establishing rigid Canyon Development Standards minimizing house fires and also hardening the house when faced with a . :: . wildfire. • Providing an incentive program encouraging property owners to institute Fire -wise principles in their homes and landscaping • Insuring all water hydrants are maintained and operational • Improving signing and mapping for non -conforming roads. From the Survey, a tenth of respondents said that resident/training and education is the most important fire safety issue in Carbon Canyon. In addition, almost half of survey respondents believe fire safe education resources are readily available and effective, meaning a little more than half thought it was just acceptable or deficient. Also, all survey respondents believe making a building fire resistant is important. Accurate Weather Information. Since the weather in Carbon Canyon can be highly variable and unique during a wind -driven fire event, it would be extremely helpful to have Weather Stations in the Canyon so fire agencies could access weather on a real-time basis. Since the last CWPP, the Fire Safe Council obtained and installed a weather station at the Chino Hills State Park Discovery Center on the west end of the canyon. There is still a need for connecting all of the available data with the local fire agencies to insure fire commanders are provided accurate information. Fire Watch Programs. During Red Flag conditions it can be helpful to have some extra eyes on the ground watching for things which could lead to a fire. This program could involve trained members on patrol, possibly including State Park rangers, or just involve residents using binoculars from their homes. This program should also identify the optimal and accessible vantage points within the Canyon as well as the location of water tanks. Since there is only one access road in and out of the canyon, a citizen patrol would be especially useful. Also, the use of fire watch programs in reporting fires early will help slow Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan down the cycle of native vegetation burning too frequently, which converts the habitat to more dangerous flashy fuels. All survey respondents felt that a volunteer fire watch during red flag conditions is important. There is a current fire watch program staffed by volunteers from the Irvine Ranch Conservancy. Disaster Communication Programs. Information is critical to residents during disasters. Communication obstacles due to inoperative phone lines and loss of electrical power should be anticipated. An alternate method of communications should be developed reporting information to a central location for dissemination. This alternate communications system should be periodically tested through realistic scenarios, such as by Fire Watch personnel during Red Flag conditions. The survey asked what communication channel people relied to stay informed in an emergency, with the following responses: • Local Agency/Next Door 43% • Social Media/Internet 2S% • Radio/TV 22% • Fire Safe Council 10% Gold Spotted Oak Borer/Shot Hole Borer. Due to the potential threat to the oak trees in the canyon from the Gold Spotted Oak Borer (GSOB), an outbreak of this pest would create large stands of dead oak trees constituting a fire threat. Additionally, the Shot Hole Borer has attacked sycamore, willow, and other trees in riparian areas. Therefore, a program insuring the GSOB and other tree pests do not spread to Carbon Canyon should be instituted. Firestone Boy Scout Reservation. A large portion of the Firestone Boy Scout Reservation is now owned by the City of Industry. This land encompasses over 4,000 acres of undisturbed oak woodlands and grasslands. Recreation and camping use occurs on weekends by the Boy Scouts and other groups. An evacuation and fire safety plan should be developed for this unique setting. In addition, this property could be used as a staging area for fire crews and an ingress/egress route during fires. Evacuation Plans. Since Carbon Canyon is essentially one long canyon, there are very few viable evacuation routes. Sometimes it can be as simple as determining that since going left is on fire, you need to go right. But it is not always that simple. Plans need to be made, especially where pets or large animals are involved. More than a quarter of survey respondents felt that planning for evacuation is the most important fire safety issue, and all respondents felt that developing plans is important. Therefore, evacuation plans should be developed for both ends of the canyon and then communicated to canyon residents. Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan SECTION IV — ACTION PLAN AND ASSESSMENT STRATEGY CARBON CANYON ROAD Previous Projects Scheduled vegetation clearing of the roadsides in Carbon Canyon. Previous Project Outcomes Both Caltrans districts have cleared roadside vegetation, but it does not appear to be on a routine schedule. Further confirmation from Caltrans is needed. Proposed Projects Continue scheduled vegetation clearing of the roadsides in Carbon Canyon. • Who will provide and do what? Caltrans will continue to implement the maintenance schedule for Carbon Canyon Road. • Potential Funding Potential funding from Caltrans • Timeline N/A • Monitoring and Evaluation CCFSC and local Fire Departments will monitor compliance with agreed upon schedule. X13; Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan MANUFACTURED HOME PARKS Previous Projects Education of residents and Park management of Fire Wise and Emergency Preparedness principles. Previous Project Outcomes Provided Fire Wise and Ready, Set, Go information that was specific to manufactured housing to the two manufactured home parks in the Canyon. Proposed Projects Continue education of residents and Park management of Fire Wise and Emergency Preparedness principles. • Who will provide and do what? CCFSC and local Fire Departments will provide educational material and distribute that material to the Parks with the assistance of Park management. • Potential Funding Potential funding for educational materials from public agencies, grants, or other sources. • Timeline By June 30, 2018 • Monitoring and Evaluation CCFSC and local Fire Departments will monitor the results of distributing this information. Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan FIRE PLANS FOR ALL INSTITUTIONAL/INDUSTRIAL ENTITIES IN THE CANYON Previous Projects Identify and collect the Fire Plans for all industrial and institutional entities in the canyon. Previous Project Outcomes The State Department of Parks & Recreation is in the process of developing the Fire Management Plan for Chino Hills State Park. The Brea Fire Department provides periodic inspections of the various oil properties in the canyon. Proposed Projects Verify the existence of Fire Management Plans for all industrial and institutional entities in the canyon with the appropriate fire agency. • Who will provide and do what? CCFSC will verify with the appropriate fire agency that each industrial and institutional entity has provided its Fire Management Plan. • Potential Funding None • Timeline By December 31, 2017 • Monitoring and Evaluation Each Fire Management Plan will be reviewed by the appropriate Fire Agency for completeness and for how it affects the entire canyon. Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan VEGETATION MANAGEMENT Previous Projects • Removal of non-native and dead vegetation in Carbon Creek and flood control channels • Thinning of dead vegetation and ladder fuels within 100 feet of structures, including education about defensible space and fire safe landscaping. • Assist residents with disposal of their cut vegetation • Identify existing sensitive species habitat. • Develop a post -fire native habitat restoration plan Previous Project Outcomes • Through various funding sources, the CCFSC coordinated and funded removal of non-native and dead vegetation in Carbon Creek and flood control channels, including a major removal of palm trees and other non-native vegetation on City of Chino Hills property. • Provided information to canyon residents about defensible space and fire safe landscaping through the CCFSC newsletter. • Provided semi-annual vegetation disposal days in which the CCFSC and the City of Chino Hills obtained a 40 cubic yard dumpster for residents to dispose of their cut vegetation. • The State Department of Parks & Recreation developed a vegetation management plan for Chino Hills State Park, which is immediately adjacent to the communities in the canyon. • This Vegetation Management Plan can also be used to determine the needs for a post -fire native habitat restoration plan. Proposed Protects 1) Continue the removal of non-native and dead vegetation in Carbon Creek and flood control channels o Who will provide and do what? ♦ CCFSC and local Fire Departments will encourage property owners to clear properties that they own, while working to identify funding sources if needed with environmental reporting or to help property owners clear creek. o Potential Funding Potential funding from public agencies, grants, or other sources. o Timeline ♦ This program will have an on-going need without an ending point. o Monitoring and Evaluation CCFSC and local Fire Departments will monitor Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan 2) The CCFSC will continue to encourage the thinning of dead vegetation and ladder fuels within 100 feet of structures, including education about defensible space and fire safe landscaping. o Who will provide and do what? CCFSC and local Fire Departments will continue the education of homeowners and business owners about keeping dead vegetation and ladder fuels from their property, with enforcement used as needed. CCFSC and local Fire Departments will also distribute educational material to residents as necessary. o Potential Funding Potential funding from Local Fire Departments and potential grant funding for educational materials. o Timeline ♦ The Weed Abatement Programs are ongoing throughout the year. ♦ Deliver educational materials to residents through the CCFSC semi-annual newsletter. o Monitoring and Evaluation FSC and local Fire Departments will monitor the results of distributing the information. 3) Continue to assist residents with disposal of their cut vegetation o Who will provide and do what? City of Chino Hills will continue to provide two 40 cubic yard dumpsters two times a year. CCFSC will staff dumpsters on those two occasions. o Potential Funding Potential funding from the City of Chino Hills. Potential grant funding. o Timeline One event in the fall and one event in the spring. o Monitoring and Evaluation CCFSC will monitor the use of the program and the volume of collected vegetation. ( 17 Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan 4) Develop a post -fire native habitat restoration plan • Who will provide and do what? CCFSC will work with State Parks and other public agencies to develop a plan which would identify the methods of habitat restoration after a fire. • Potential Funding Potential funding from public agencies, grants, or other sources. • Timeline Completion of plan by December 31, 2019. • Monitoring and Evaluation CCFSC and State Parks will monitor. Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan CREATING FIRE SAFE NEIGHBORHOODS Previous Projects • Offer Fire Safety Training to residents, including use of power tools near brush, use of Reverse 911, knowledge of the Ready Set Go Program, and taking CERT training. • Provide information on fire resistive building products and ways to retrofit existing homes. • Establish tough canyon development standards. • Provide an incentive program that encourages property owners to institute fire wise principles in their homes and landscaping. • Insure that all water hydrants are maintained and operational. • Improved signage and mapping for non -conforming roads. Previous Proiect Outcomes • City of Brea offered Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) training to canyon residents. • Provided information to canyon residents through the CCFSC semi-annual newsletter about fire safety principles, including use of power tools near brush, use of Reverse 911, knowledge of the Ready Set Go Program. • Due to lack of funding the CCFSC did not provide information on fire resistive building products and ways to retrofit existing homes. • The State Fire Code has increased the requirements for homes in High Hazard Fire areas. • Due to lack of funding the CCFSC did not provide an incentive program that encourages property owners to institute fire wise principles in their homes and landscaping. • The cities of Brea and Chino Hills continue to insure that all water hydrants are maintained and operational. In addition, in the Sleepy Hollow area of Chino Hills, the City has funded a Capital Improvement Project to reconstruct the water and hydrant system in the neighborhood. • The CVIFD has developed maps for non -conforming roads, but signage on those streets is still needed. Proposed Protects 1) Continue to offer Fire Safety Training to residents, including use of power tools near brush, use of Reverse 911, knowledge of the Ready Set Go Program, and taking CERT training. o Who will provide and do what? CCFSC and local fire departments will offer training and distribute educational material to residents for the above items. o Potential Funding Potential funding for educational material from public agencies, grants or other sources. o Timeline By December 31, 2017. f 19 Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan o Monitoring and Evaluation CCFSC and local fire departments will annually identify the number of reverse 911 users and number of residents who received training. 2) Provide information on fire resistive building products and ways to retrofit existing homes • Who will provide and do what? CCFSC and local Fire Departments will provide educational materials to property owners on the best way to harden their structure from fire. CCFSC will also explore possible funding sources to help property owners retrofit their structures. • Potential Funding Potential funding for educational materials from public agencies, grants, or other sources. Potential funding for retrofitting structures from grants. • Timeline Distribute educational materials by December 31, 2017. Identify potential retrofitting funding by December 31, 2018. • Monitoring and Evaluation CCFSC and local Fire Departments will monitor the number of retrofitted structures. 3) Provide an incentive program that encourages property owners to institute fire wise principles in their homes and landscaping. • Who will provide and do what? CCFSC will continually provide information on Firewise homes and landscaping through newsletters, community meetings, outreach booths, and a Wildfire Awareness Fair. Home assessments will be conducted by CCFSC members and local Fire Departments as requested by property owners. • Potential Funding o Landscaping wood chips are available free of charge from the City of Chino Hills. o Potential donation or low cost fire and drought resistant native plants from local nurseries. o Potential CBDG or grant funding to offer as a match for retrofitting existing homes to meet current wildland urban interface standards. o Recognition by the local government with possible insurance incentives. http://www.nationalforestassociation.org/forestcare.php 20 Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan • Timeline Identify the scope of an incentive program by December 31, 2018. • Monitoring and Evaluation Monitoring would start at initial contact and finish at the final evaluation and would be conducted by CCFSC and local Fire Departments. 4) Improved signage for non -conforming roads o Who will provide and do what? ♦ CCFSC and City of Chino Hills will develop feasible solutions to any potential traffic safety problems that are identified, and identify needed signage. o Potential Funding Potential funding from the City of Chino Hills o Timeline ♦ Identify signage needs by December 31, 2018. ♦ Implement solutions by December 31, 2019. o Monitoring and Evaluation CCFSC will monitor the progress. IL i Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan ACCURATE WEATHER INFORMATION Previous Proiects Place and monitor weather stations at various spots within the Canyon. Previous Proiect Outcomes The CCFSC placed a weather station at the Chino Hills State Park Discovery Center with internet uplink of information. Proposed Proiects Insure that surrounding fire agencies are aware of and have a plan to use the information from the various weather stations in the canyon during fire conditions. • Who will provide and do what? CCFSC will coordinate with local Fire Departments to develop a plan to the use the information from the various weather stations on a real-time basis during fire conditions. • Potential Funding N/A • Timeline By June 30, 2018. • Monitoring and Evaluation The CCFSC will maintain the station and provide periodic tests on the equipment to insure its reliability. Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan FIRE WATCH PROGRAMS Previous Projects Implement a Fire Watch program in the canyon and State Park during Red Flag conditions. Previous Proiect Outcomes There is a program from the Irvine Ranch Conservancy that places Fire Watch volunteers on the Brea side of the canyon during red flag conditions. The CCFSC has not implemented its own program or joined and expanded this existing program. Proposed Projects Implement a Fire Watch program in the canyon and State Park during Red Flag conditions • Who will provide and do what? CCFSC will coordinate with local Fire Departments, State Parks, and other agencies about the scope of a potential Fire Watch Program. CCFSC will then work with local Fire Departments, State Parks, and other agencies to implement that program. • Potential Funding Potential funding of materials costs from Local Fire Departments, State Parks, or grant funding. • Timeline ♦ Identify program scope by December 31, 2017. ♦ Implement program by June 30, 2018. • Monitoring and Evaluation CCFSC, local Fire Departments, and State Parks will monitor the progress and provide periodic training. IL i Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan DISASTER COMMUNICATION PROGRAMS Previous Proiects Develop an alternate method of communications canyon -wide to report information to a central location for dissemination. Previous Project Outcomes While canyon residents use various diffuse sources for information during an emergency, there is no single reliable source that residents use, especially if there is no electrical power or cell signal. Proposed Projects 1) Identify reliable government agency sites which will post timely information to their websites during a fire. o Who will provide and do what? ■ CCFSC will work with local government agencies to determine their policies about posting timely information during a fire. ■ Once reliable sites for information are identified, CCFSC will distribute this information to canyon residents through the CCFSC newsletter. o Potential Funding ■ Potential grant funding for CCFSC newsletter. o Timeline ■ Identify government sites which will post information by June 30, 2017. ■ Distribute information to canyon residents by December 31, 2017. o Monitoring and Evaluation ■ CCFSC will continue to monitor recommended sites to insure that information will continue to be posted during a fire. 2) Develop an alternate method of communications canyon -wide to report information to a central location for dissemination o Who will provide and do what? ■ CCFSC, the Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Services (RACES), and the Chino Hills Auxiliary Radio Team (CHART) will encourage the recruitment and further development of a canyon -wide amateur radio group for use during disasters. Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan ■ CCFSC will develop a social media account, such as Facebook or Twitter, to use during canyon incidents to provide real-time information to residents. o Potential Funding Potential grant funding for disaster communications equipment. o Timeline o Develop Facebook and/or Twitter accounts by December 31, 2017. o Recruitment and development of amateur radio group will be on-going. o Monitoring and Evaluation Social media accounts will be monitored by assigned CCFSC administrators using adopted protocol standards for posting. There will be weekly tests of amateur radio frequency. This alternate communications system should be periodically tested through realistic scenarios, such as by Fire Watch personnel during Red Flag conditions. Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan GOLD SPOTTED OAK BORER & SHOT HOLE BORER Previous Projects • Education of canyon residents about GSOB. • Install GSOB traps within the canyon Previous Proiect Outcomes • The CCFSC published educational information about GSOB in multiple CCFSC newsletters • Due to lack of funding, the CCFSC did not install GSOB traps within the canyon Proposed Proiects 1) Education of canyon residents about GSOB o Who will provide and do what? ■ CCFSC and local Fire Departments will provide educational material to monitor the presence of GSOB and then on how to stop the spread of GSOB to Carbon Canyon. ■ CCFSC will work with Caltrans to place a GSOB awareness sign on Carbon Canyon Road. o Potential Funding Potential funding from public agencies, grants or other sources. o Timeline ■ Provide information material — On-going. ■ Place GSOB Awareness sign by December 31, 2017. o Monitoring and Evaluation CCFSC will monitor the progress. 2) Install GSOB traps within the canyon o Who will provide and do what? CCFSC will obtain traps and install them at appropriate places in the canyon. o Potential Funding Potential grant funding o Timeline IL i Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan By December 31, 2018. o Monitoring and Evaluation CCFSC will monitor the progress. 3) Mapping, Monitoring, Education, and Eradication of Shot Hole Borer o Who will provide and do what? ■ CCFSC, State Parks, and local Fire Departments will provide educational material to monitor the presence of Shot Hole Borer and then on how to stop the spread of Shot Hole Borer in Carbon Canyon and the surrounding area. ■ CCFSC will work with State Parks, and local Fire Departments to map the spread of shot hole borer in Carbon Canyon and the surrounding area. ■ CCFSC will work with State Parks, and local Fire Departments to monitor the spread of shot hole borer in Carbon Canyon and the surrounding area. ■ CCFSC will work with State Parks, and local Fire Departments to remove infested trees in Carbon Canyon and the surrounding area. o Potential Funding Potential funding from public agencies, grants or other sources. o Timeline ■ Provide information material — On-going. ■ Mapping the spread of Shot Hole Borer by December 31, 2018. ■ Monitoring the on-going spread of Shot Hole Borer by December 31, 2019. ■ Removal of infested trees—As needed. o Monitoring and Evaluation CCFSC and State Parks will monitor the progress. Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan FIRESTONE BOY SCOUT RESERVATION Previous Proiects Develop an evacuation and fire safety plan Previous Proiect Outcomes An evacuation and fire safety plan was not identified by the CCFSC. Proposed Proiects Develop an evacuation and fire safety plan • Who will provide and do what? CCFSC and local Fire Departments will work with the Boy Scouts and City of Industry to develop the evacuation and fire safety plan. • Potential Funding Potential funding from public agencies, grants, or other sources. • Timeline By December 31, 2018. • Monitoring and Evaluation CCFSC and local Fire Departments will monitor the progress. r 28 Carbon Canyon Community Wildfire Protection Plan CARBON CANYON EVACUATION PLANS Previous Projects None Previous Project Outcomes None Proposed Projects Develop an evacuation and fire safety plan for Carbon Canyon residents, as well as identify secondary egress points. • Who will provide and do what? CCFSC and local Fire Departments will develop an evacuation and fire safety plan for Carbon Canyon residents, and distribute that information to canyon residents. Also, identify secondary evacuation egress points • Potential Funding Potential funding from public agencies, grants, or other sources. • Timeline By December 31, 2018. • Monitoring and Evaluation CCFSC and local Fire Departments will monitor the progress. THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK CARBON CANYON CWPP STAKEHOLDERS NAME PRIMARY STAKEHOLDERS George Ullrich CCFSC Eric Johnson CCFSC APPENDIX A ORGANIZATION Kathy Schaefer Brea Fire Ryan Dacko Chino Valley Fire District Ken Kietzer State Parks Alissa Ing State Parks Ryann Gill State Parks SECONDARY STAKEHOLDERS Debbie Chapman Cal Fire George Ewan OCFA J Lopez Los Angeles County Fire David Whitney Los Angeles County Fire Geary Hund US Fish and Wildlife Matt Chirdon Cal Dept of Fish and Game Steve Sowers Caltrans - OC Bob Riddle Caltrans - OC Savat Khamphou Caltrans - SB Bonnie Michaels Chino Hills Emergency Management John Mura Chino Hills Public Works Christopher Izzy San Bernardino Sheriff Lisa Keyworth Brea Emergency Management Tony Olmos Brea Public Works Brian Ingallinera Brea NPDES Cliff Flaugher Brea Info Tech John Ballas City of Industry Engineer John Fogarty BOUSD Operations Mgmt Stephanie Gibson Chino Hills Unified School District Joanne Taylor Orange County Parks Jose Gamboa Orange County Landfill Pat Buttress SCE Tina Javid So Cal Gas Company Lee Reeder Santa Ana Watershed Association James Law Santa Ana Watershed Association Regional Water Quality Control Board Oscar Abarca AQMD Jay Field Army Corps of Engineers Trudi Loy MWD Plant Manager Claire Schlotterbeck Hills For Everyone Trish Hocking Olinda Village Homeowners Assoc Carl Hostetter Olinda Ranch HOA President Misty Thomas Merit Properties (ORHOA) Empire Management Oak Tree Downs HOA Charley Blank Summit Ranch HOA Page 1 of 2 CARBON CANYON CWPP STAKEHOLDERS APPENDIX A NAME ORGANIZATION Jose Tovar Carriage Hills HOA Manager Hollydale Mobilehome Park Barbara Causa Western Hills Estates MHP - on-site Bill Poulter Western Hills Estates MHP - off-site Puranatmanandaji Maharaj Bharat Sevashram Sangha Victor Varisco St. Joseph's Hill of Hope Christine Smith Western Hills Golf Course Luz Thompson State Farm Insurance John Ekno Farmers Insurance Kelley Hartranft EI Rodeo George Basye Aera Energy Kathleen Maisch Linn Energy Jeff Winkler Breitburn Energy Jessica Okamoto Hata (La Vida) - Asset Advisors Corp Sorat Singh Chino540, LLC Robert Koe Jackie Muro Canyon Crest/Madrona Matt Halsig Firestone Boy Scouts Caretaker Phillip Chen Assemblyman - 55th District Josh Newman State Senator - 29th District Ed Royce Congressman - 39th District Shawn Nelson OC Supervisor - 4th District Curt Hagman SB Supervisor - 4th District Page 2 of 2 Carbon Canyon Communities Wildland Urban Interface Area �e ;i jio Irl. s� _ J l f L r y , ►� ��'� fu iI r�1� i3.I fibll f..� WS 0 N W E S 0 0.5 1 2 3 4 Miles 1:21,120 Legend dire Wildland Urban Interface Area 0 I A COUNCIL ®amu 7 �: ,. `ate, ■ a■. Jj �i ■ i �, ice• �� �' .. T �` u As 4�■ r ,17 man ��".• ■1E r ss 7 ;_„S • or r fit n ■ '■ 'nrin y e' ► rte' r�b!!!�!�� \ .Q }, ■ ■ r F' SAS■� r �, - vy'� a s � r ■ © -o-;r • � w. � ■°- `:I { _ � , ' •cam � •y e� r '� 'r���'�.,_ �� � � � � n ■ ".t aur �F�,!` m '�jJ %�� r ■ F IS. ■ i _ [y y��,ayr��a {r� r re r r ®■ r r . l� ■fir f till, a VA `[I ���.eee�eee■■■, pry q1■���^ ■� 1 us�IMP JL- iJ *IT .9.� ®�i6q - .. ` �' � ■ n � � i - 'i ilia 11�' F IAC_I �r ����G��i �1'�? ���� _ IWi��F���`'�1'"a� .../,�, ::�. ,+r I..J e►� � �$ J', , E Carbon Canyon Fire History & Wildland Urban Interface Area �1 LOS ANGELES i m } i < `c y T fygobaLlnda81l .f S i,16A n x Bj6tan0h111y "A �f Yr ba LMW3 vada a Lind A RM d L QMMVIs la AYE a Alin Vd6taS1 Rlko '•ixi •• Plizedntle - I" . F CI M'[h er Awe.. 1E orw, pell,o rpe Avr Freeway Complex 2008 - Rose 2007 Yorba Linda 2005 Blue Gum 2002 s° P ri�7o WHills -cuyl f i 4 �1 ' 1(jjnbnl4 Awe r r n� R itl: 4 A 4 V k5�rkmu� W TI • ` r ORANGE SS (RIVI �•,x r p ,40! 41. nasi � ��� I� ♦t F`pk1 3" Sources: Esri, DeLorme, NAVTEQ, USGS,(1ntermap, PC, NRVCAN� Esri Japan, MET17Esri\ Kong), Esri (Thailand), TomTom, 2012 40 Mv Shell 1947 & 1985 Carbon Canyon Fire 1990 Soquel 1978 0 0.250.5 Wagon Fire 1994 Carbon Fire 1980 0 Firestone Fire 1967 m Carbon 1994 Owl 1980 La Vida 1959 ® Yorba 1990 Ranch 1979 Wildland Urban Interface Area ina (Hong Miles1141", %� rj ire COUNCIL April 4, 2016 Carbon Canyon Fire Origin History Wildland Urban Interface Area s l e M1t.F �by -.^ i4S• i� �Vr -q S ' I F ./ rr -ry hili .1 Chino HillsT. �. 0 Los Angeles County Orange County w — — — - �r GAO J r Chino Hills State Park - •-•; .-- •IAT �.� - �� .•, � - _ Or - LB re A -_ I. r N W E S 0 0.5 1 3 4 Miles 1:21,120 Fire Origin DaW compiled by and provided by Hills For Everyone o �Fil V�" , COUNCIL Legend FIRE—NAME 0 Chino Hills Pkwy 0 La Vida 0 Carbon Canyon 9 Feldspar 9 Shell 0 Carbon Canyon (Wagon) Q Firestone Fire 0 Western Hills 0 Chino Hills Parkway 0 Freeway Complex 112 Wildland Urban Interface Area Fire Origin DaW compiled by and provided by Hills For Everyone o �Fil V�" , COUNCIL CARBON CANYON COMMUNITY WILDFIRE PROTECTION PLAN COMMUNITY RISK ASSESSMENT LEVEL OF IMPACT: 8 8 8 10 2016 VERSION FIRE RISK BLDG CONSTR/ FIRE FIRE FUEL SLOPES DENSITY RISK FREQUENCY RISK RISK RISK TOTALS STRUCTURES SINGLE/MULTIFAMILY HOUSING OLINDA RANCH OLINDA VILLAGE SLEEPY HOLLOW MOUNTAIN VIEW ESTATES OAK TREE DOWNS PINE VALLEY ESTATES WESTERN HILLS OAKS CARRIAGE HILLS SUMMIT RANCH HILL CREST MOBILE HOME HOUSING HOLLYDALE MOBILE HOME PARK WESTERN HILLS MOBILEHOME PARK COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS OLINDA VILLAGE SLEEPY HOLLOW CIRCLE -K FIRE STATIONS BREA FIRE STATION 4 CHINO VALLEY FIRE STATION 64 CHURCHES BHARAT SEVASHRAM SANGHA WEST ST. JOSEPH'S HILL OF HOPE STABLES EL RODEO STABLES MANELY FRIENDS STABLES 5 5 3 5 8 7 6 6 7 5 7 10 7 5 10 10 8 5 5 2 8 5 6 2 8 6 7 5 5 5 6 5 5 5 4 5 6 5 7 2 aaa . aaa . aaa . aaa aaa aaa . aaa aaa . 154 228 252 276 164 172 218 178 162 164 218 202 148 210 138 242 258 180 270 APPENDIX D RISK ASSESSMENT 2016.xlsx 1 of 8 CARBON CANYON COMMUNITY WILDFIRE PROTECTION PLAN COMMUNITY RISK ASSESSMENT LEVEL OF IMPACT: 8 8 8 10 2016 VERSION FIRE RISK BLDG CONSTR/ FIRE FIRE FUEL SLOPES DENSITY RISK FREQUENCY RISK RISK RISK TOTALS INFRASTRUCTURE ROADS STATE HIGHWAY 142 ELECTRIC FACILITIES & POWER LINES MWD DEIMER PLANT WATER FACILITIES & LINES SEWER FACILITIES & LINES NATURAL GAS LINES PHONE EQUIPMENT & LINES CELL PHONE EQUIPMENT CABLE TV EQUIPMENT & LINES COMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT/TOWERS RECREATIONAL & SCENIC CHINO HILLS STATE PARK DISCOVERY CENTER CARBON CANYON COUNTY PARK OLINDA MUSEUM WESTERN HILLS GOLF COURSE FIRESTONE BOY SCOUT RESERVATION WATERSHEDS CARBON CREEK SOQUEL CREEK/CARBON CREEK HEADWATE TELEGRAPH CREEK/CARBON CREEK HEADW OTHER OIL DRILLING FACILITIES & EQUIPMENT SHELL/AERA BREITBURN LIN N OLINDA COUNTY LANDFILL 10 8 8 0 10 8 8 0 7 5 10 0 0 8 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 8 8 0 10 8 8 0 10 8 8 0 10 8 8 0 10 8 8 0 7 3 2 1 3 5 3 0 5 6 6 5 7 5 4 4 9 10 10 0 Baa . aaa aaa aaa aaa aaa 208 208 176 128 0 0 208 208 208 208 208 106 88 186 168 232 176 152 152 104 120 104 120 APPENDIX D RISK ASSESSMENT 2016.xlsx 2 of 8 APPENDIX D CARBON CANYON COMMUNITY WILDFIRE PRC COMMUNITY RISK ASSESSMENT LEVEL OF IMPACT: 10 8 8 5 5 5 2016 VERSION 5 PROTECTION CAPABILITIES 5 5 7 5 7 3 5 8 5 LACK OF LACK OF LACK OF LACK OF LACK OF 8 PROTECTION 4 RESPONSE RESPONSE RESPONSE PREVENTION ESCAPE 5 CAPABILITIES 4 RESOURCES ACCESS TIME PROGRAMS ROUTES 3 TOTALS STRUCTURES SINGLE/MULTIFAMILY HOUSING OLINDA RANCH OLINDA VILLAGE SLEEPY HOLLOW MOUNTAIN VIEW ESTATES OAK TREE DOWNS PINE VALLEY ESTATES WESTERN HILLS OAKS CARRIAGE HILLS SUMMIT RANCH HILL CREST MOBILE HOME HOUSING HOLLYDALE MOBILE HOME PARK WESTERN HILLS MOBILEHOME PARK COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS OLINDA VILLAGE SLEEPY HOLLOW CIRCLE -K FIRE STATIONS BREA FIRE STATION 4 CHINO VALLEY FIRE STATION 64 CHURCHES BHARAT SEVASHRAM SANGHA WEST ST. JOSEPH'S HILL OF HOPE STABLES EL RODEO STABLES MANELY FRIENDS STABLES 5 3 3 5 4 5 4 5 5 7 5 7 3 5 8 5 7 3 5 8 5 4 4 5 7 5 4 4 5 5 5 3 2 5 7 5 3 2 5 5 5 3 3 5 5 5 7 3 5 7 5 7 7 5 4-7 7 5 4 2 5 aaaaa aaaaa aaaaa aaaaa aaaaa aaaaa aaaa� aaaaa aaaaa 143 182 195 195 174 164 150 140 148 190 222 158 198 195 142 35 35 198 251 151 240 RISK ASSESSMENT 2016.xlsx 3 of 8 APPENDIX D CARBON CANYON COMMUNITY WILDFIRE PRC COMMUNITY RISK ASSESSMENT LEVEL OF IMPACT: 10 8 8 5 5 7 2016 VERSION PROTECTION CAPABILITIES 0 5 0 5 5 5 5 LACK OF LACK OF LACK OF LACK OF LACK OF PROTECTION RESPONSE RESPONSE RESPONSE PREVENTION ESCAPE CAPABILITIES RESOURCES ACCESS TIME PROGRAMS ROUTES TOTALS INFRASTRUCTURE 5 0 0 5 ROADS 5 0 0 5 STATE HIGHWAY 142 ELECTRIC FACILITIES & POWER LINES MWD DEIMER PLANT WATER FACILITIES & LINES SEWER FACILITIES & LINES NATURAL GAS LINES PHONE EQUIPMENT & LINES CELL PHONE EQUIPMENT CABLE TV EQUIPMENT & LINES COMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT/TOWERS RECREATIONAL & SCENIC CHINO HILLS STATE PARK DISCOVERY CENTER CARBON CANYON COUNTY PARK OLINDA MUSEUM WESTERN HILLS GOLF COURSE FIRESTONE BOY SCOUT RESERVATION WATERSHEDS CARBON CREEK SOQUEL CREEK/CARBON CREEK HEADWATE TELEGRAPH CREEK/CARBON CREEK HEADW OTHER OIL DRILLING FACILITIES & EQUIPMENT SHELL/AERA BREITBURN LIN N OLINDA COUNTY LANDFILL 5 5 5 5 7 5 0 0 5 0 5 5 5 5 3 5 0 0 5 0 5 0 0 5 0 5 0 0 5 0 5 0 0 5 0 5 0 0 5 0 5 0 0 5 0 5 0 0 5 0 5 8 8 5 7 5 3 3 5 4 5 3 3 5 4 5 3 3 5 4 5 4 2 5 7 5 10 10 7 8 5 6 6 0 6 5 7 7 0 7 5 5 4 0 5 5 5 3 5 2 5 5 3 5 4 5 5 3 5 2 5 4 4 5 5 190 75 170 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 238 143 143 143 158 285 176 197 147 149 159 149 164 RISK ASSESSMENT 2016.xlsx 4 of 8 CARBON CANYON COMMUNITY WILDFIRE PRC COMMUNITY RISK ASSESSMENT LEVEL OF IMPACT: 10 5 7 8 2016 VERSION VALUES IMPACT TO IMPACT TO IMPACT TO ECOSYSTEM RECREATION/ COMM. IMPACT TO VALUES VALUES SCENIC INFR. ECONOMICS TOTALS STRUCTURES SINGLE/MULTIFAMILY HOUSING OLINDA RANCH OLINDA VILLAGE SLEEPY HOLLOW MOUNTAIN VIEW ESTATES OAK TREE DOWNS PINE VALLEY ESTATES WESTERN HILLS OAKS CARRIAGE HILLS SUMMIT RANCH HILL CREST MOBILE HOME HOUSING HOLLYDALE MOBILE HOME PARK WESTERN HILLS MOBILEHOME PARK COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS OLINDA VILLAGE SLEEPY HOLLOW CIRCLE -K FIRE STATIONS BREA FIRE STATION 4 CHINO VALLEY FIRE STATION 64 CHURCHES BHARAT SEVASHRAM SANGHA WEST ST. JOSEPH'S HILL OF HOPE STABLES EL RODEO STABLES MANELY FRIENDS STABLES 5 5 0 0 7 7 0 0 7 7 0 0 7 7 0 0 7 7 0 0 7 7 0 0 6 4 0 0 5 5 0 0 5 5 0 0 7 7 0 0 a 7 as 3 a 7 as 3 7 7 0 3 7 7 0 3 7 7 0 3 a as a as a as a as a as a as 75 105 105 105 105 105 80 75 75 105 105 90 129 129 129 35 35 105 110 116 115 APPENDIX D RISK ASSESSMENT 2016.xlsx 5 of 8 CARBON CANYON COMMUNITY WILDFIRE PRC COMMUNITY RISK ASSESSMENT LEVEL OF IMPACT: 10 5 7 8 2016 VERSION VALUES IMPACT TO IMPACT TO IMPACT TO ECOSYSTEM RECREATION/ COMM. IMPACT TO VALUES VALUES SCENIC INFR. ECONOMICS TOTALS INFRASTRUCTURE ROADS STATE HIGHWAY 142 ELECTRIC FACILITIES & POWER LINES MWD DEIMER PLANT WATER FACILITIES & LINES SEWER FACILITIES & LINES NATURAL GAS LINES PHONE EQUIPMENT & LINES CELL PHONE EQUIPMENT CABLE TV EQUIPMENT & LINES COMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT/TOWERS RECREATIONAL & SCENIC CHINO HILLS STATE PARK DISCOVERY CENTER CARBON CANYON COUNTY PARK OLINDA MUSEUM WESTERN HILLS GOLF COURSE FIRESTONE BOY SCOUT RESERVATION WATERSHEDS CARBON CREEK SOQUEL CREEK/CARBON CREEK HEADWATE TELEGRAPH CREEK/CARBON CREEK HEADW OTHER OIL DRILLING FACILITIES & EQUIPMENT SHELL/AERA BREITBURN LIN N OLINDA COUNTY LANDFILL 8 8 10 4 7 7 10 6 7 7 10 8 7 6 8 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 6 0 0 8 6 0 0 4 4 0 0 8 4 9 10 0 2 7 10 5 2 6 10 4 2 5 8 4 1 6 8 0 2 10 8 0 0 7 7 0 0 7 7 0 0 7 7 0 0 a as a as a as a as 222 223 239 204 0 0 104 104 60 88 156 171 154 126 116 140 105 105 105 93 123 93 155 APPENDIX D RISK ASSESSMENT 2016.xlsx 6 of 8 APPENDIX D CARBON CANYON COMMUNITY WILDFIRE PRC COMMUNITY RISK ASSESSMENT LEVEL OF IMPACT: 2016 VERSION TOTALS FIRE PROTECTION RISK CAPABILITIES VALUES STRUCTURES SINGLE/MULTIFAMILY HOUSING OLINDA RANCH OLINDA VILLAGE SLEEPY HOLLOW MOUNTAIN VIEW ESTATES OAK TREE DOWNS PINE VALLEY ESTATES WESTERN HILLS OAKS CARRIAGE HILLS SUMMIT RANCH HILL CREST MOBILE HOME HOUSING HOLLYDALE MOBILE HOME PARK WESTERN HILLS MOBILEHOME PARK COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS OLINDA VILLAGE SLEEPY HOLLOW CIRCLE -K FIRE STATIONS BREA FIRE STATION 4 CHINO VALLEY FIRE STATION 64 CHURCHES BHARAT SEVASHRAM SANGHA WEST ST. JOSEPH'S HILL OF HOPE STABLES EL RODEO STABLES MANELY FRIENDS STABLES 154 143 75 228 182 105 252 195 105 276 195 105 164 174 105 172 164 105 218 150 80 178 140 75 162 148 75 164 190 105 292 222 105 236 158 90 218 198 129 202 195 129 148 142 129 210 35 35 138 35 35 242 198 105 258 251 110 180 151 116 270 240 115 RISK ASSESSMENT 2016.xlsx 7 of 8 APPENDIX D CARBON CANYON COMMUNITY WILDFIRE PRC COMMUNITY RISK ASSESSMENT LEVEL OF IMPACT: 2016 VERSION TOTALS FIRE PROTECTION RISK CAPABILITIES VALUES INFRASTRUCTURE ROADS STATE HIGHWAY 142 ELECTRIC FACILITIES & POWER LINES MWD DEIMER PLANT WATER FACILITIES & LINES SEWER FACILITIES & LINES NATURAL GAS LINES PHONE EQUIPMENT & LINES CELL PHONE EQUIPMENT CABLE TV EQUIPMENT & LINES COMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT/TOWERS RECREATIONAL & SCENIC CHINO HILLS STATE PARK DISCOVERY CENTER CARBON CANYON COUNTY PARK OLINDA MUSEUM WESTERN HILLS GOLF COURSE FIRESTONE BOY SCOUT RESERVATION WATERSHEDS CARBON CREEK SOQUEL CREEK/CARBON CREEK HEADWATEI TELEGRAPH CREEK/CARBON CREEK HEADWI OTHER OIL DRILLING FACILITIES & EQUIPMENT SHELL/AERA BREITBURN LIN N OLINDA COUNTY LANDFILL 208 190 222 208 75 223 176 170 239 128 75 204 0 75 0 0 75 0 208 75 104 208 75 104 208 75 60 208 75 88 208 238 156 106 143 171 88 143 154 186 143 126 168 158 116 232 285 140 176 176 105 152 197 105 152 147 105 104 149 93 120 159 123 104 149 93 120 164 155 RISK ASSESSMENT 2016.xlsx 8 of 8 APPENDIX E CARBON CANYON FIRE SAFE COUNCIL CWPP SURVEY RESULTS What do you think is our overall level of safety Dangerous 25 28.41% Worry Occasionally 42 47.73% Good as Anywhere 10 11.36% Better than Average 10 11.36% No Problem 1 1.14% weighted average 2.09 Do we have adequate resources in case of a fire Not Even Close 9 10.59% A Few Things 32 37.65% Good as Anywhere 22 25.88% Better than Most 20 23.53% No Problem 2 2.35% weighted average 2.69 Are fire safe education resources readily avilable and effective What Education 6 6.98% Could find something 20 23.26% Just OK 20 23.26% Better than Most 30 34.88% Absolutely 10 11.63 weighted average 3.21 I am personally prepared for a Wildfire Not Even Close 8 9.09% Get to it Later 9 10.23% Working on it now 27 30.68% Think I'm Ready 38 43.18% Absolutely 6 6.82% weighted average 3.28 Removing non-native vegetation is important No, it's futile 8 9.76% Guess it helps 24 29.27% Absolutely 50 60.98% weighted average 2.51 Making buildings fire resistant is important No, it's waste of time 1 1.23% Sometimes 22 27.16% Absolutely 58 71.60% weighted average 2.7 Page 1 of 2 CARBON CANYON FIRE SAFE COUNCIL CWPP SURVEY RESULTS An evacuation plan for people, pets, and large animals is important No 1 1.18% Not sure 3 3.53% Absolutely 81 95.29% weighted average 2.94 Volunteer fire watch during red flag conditions is important No 0 0.00% Not sure 11 12.94% Absolutely 74 87.06% weighted average 2.87 What is most important fire safety issue in canyon Defensible Space/Dry Brush 27 35.53% Traffic 18 23.68% Evacuation Plans 21 27.63% Resident Training/Educ 7 9.21% Response Time 3 3.95% What do you rely on to stay informed Local Agency/Next Door Fire Safe Council Radio TC Social Media/Internet Page 2 of 2 30 43.48 7 10.14% 9 13.04% 6 8.70 17 24.64% APPENDIX E